Author Topic: The lazy man's carb install  (Read 9856 times)

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Offline wiskey

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The lazy man's carb install
« on: June 12, 2012, 01:10:46 pm »
Hello, I know there are a lot of these "tips" on how to get the carbs back on. Well by accident I learned the easy way last night.

I have a 77 cb750k but i'm sure this is universal. (77&78 don't have the luxury of just buying new boots)

put a little bit of oil on the boot and get them on as much as you can by hand (I can get i think about 75%) still wont be enough to be free of air leaks but in my case the engine will start and idle but would die with any kind of throttle. leave off the air box it should still run.

Let the bike warm up for a few minutes, this lets your old hard boots warm up and more importantly make them pliable.

Cut the engine and go back and start pushing the carbs on. Much to my surprise they slid on the rest of the way with very little effort!

Let the motor do the work for you!

Offline lucky

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2012, 03:52:54 pm »
Here is another easy way.
Hold the carbs up in position.
Put two zip ties to the frame to hold the carbs up.

Next push the #4 carb into the boot  as far as you can. Tighten the clamp.
Then go to the other side of the bike and push #1 carb into its boot. Tighten the clamp.

Offline Gurp

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2012, 03:39:20 am »
I always put a dot of vasaline around the boots and then sat on the front tire reached around the engine grabbed 1 and 4 and leaned back and then slide right into place. a good freind showed me this.
Mankinds Greatest enemy has and always be itself.


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Offline 72_350_FOUR

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2012, 06:11:38 am »
I found the carbs went on easy on my 350F, it's the darn black plastic chamber thats connects the air cleaner and the carbs that gave me fits.  i found no easy way of getting it on. Any tips on that ?
1972 Honda CB350F

Offline seat cover man

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2012, 09:06:25 pm »
i always just bring the intakes to a boil on the stove then slap em in order on the bike. u would be surprised with the expansion and it buys u like 3 minutes to get the carbs set in perfect place....im pretty sure industrial cafe taught me this trick...
71' CB750 K1

Offline DWS

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2012, 07:51:18 pm »
hair dyer works good to to warm the boots up before you install :-X
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78CB750F3
PD 42A with original breadbox
4 into 1
valves adjusted to .003 (intake and exhaust) ( as was suggested for cooling )
slow jets#35 Main #110
 turned out to 1.5 some paper work says 1.75
4800 feet altitude

78 Honda CB 750 F3 Restoring now(Almost done)
BSA MX 50 Next
BSA b50T Parts

Offline MoMo

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2012, 08:00:44 pm »
I found the carbs went on easy on my 350F, it's the darn black plastic chamber thats connects the air cleaner and the carbs that gave me fits.  i found no easy way of getting it on. Any tips on that ?


The chamber has to be on before the carbs go on. I use C=clamps to hold it back against the frame and the carbs wil then have enough room to fit in.  Others use tie downs.  Search and you should get several other ideas but the clamps have always worked for me as long as the boots are soft (or have been softened in wintergreen/xylene...Larry

Offline trueblue

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2012, 02:23:27 am »
On my 650Z, I sit astride the bike with it up on the centre stand, place my hands on the carbs with my knees behind my hands and my feet on the pegs.  Push off the pegs with my feet and the carbs pop straight on.  This technique may be a little difficult with the other SOHC4's because the 650Z's pegs are set further back than the factory spot on all the others I have seen.
1979 CB650Z
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Offline LesterPiglet

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2012, 04:41:17 am »
I have it down to a fine art now. I put the carbs on, use my foot to push one side on the engine side, clamp it then do the other side then clamp. The rubbers from the airbox can be slipped in using some lube around the mating surfaces. My rubber boots are newish so quite flexible.
'Then' and 'than' are completely different words and have completely different meanings. Same with 'of' and 'have'. Set and sit. There, their and they're. Draw and drawer. Could care less/couldn't care less. Bought/brought FFS.


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Offline DWS

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carb install
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2012, 11:38:47 am »
need parts fo my cb750 1978 f3 PD42A carbs. some doc saids its suppose to be PD42b and there not, whats up with that? bought the bike new in 1978
Always looking for friends.

78CB750F3
PD 42A with original breadbox
4 into 1
valves adjusted to .003 (intake and exhaust) ( as was suggested for cooling )
slow jets#35 Main #110
 turned out to 1.5 some paper work says 1.75
4800 feet altitude

78 Honda CB 750 F3 Restoring now(Almost done)
BSA MX 50 Next
BSA b50T Parts

Offline NewOldSchool

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2012, 12:57:07 pm »
I boiled my boots in a large pot with 4 parts water and 1 part wintergreen oil for 45 minutes. Cleaned off all the old dirt and oil as well as made them soft and pliable like new.

I will install them with a bit of lube, tighten the clamps on the head and then put the carb rack on as best I can. The trick to get them really nice and snug is to take a ratchet strap and some rags. Wrap the strap around the head, cushion the fins and carbs with rags and slowly ratchet the carbs into place until they are seated.

Easy peasy.
Not putting miles on your bike is like not having sex with your Girl Friend so she'll be more desirable to her next Boy Friend.

Offline mono

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2012, 06:01:18 am »
i usually just call my friend Bruce to come over and help me out.  i don't know what he does to get them on, but when i get back from making a beer run, he's already got them on there, and his clothes are all torn up...

Offline NewOldSchool

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2012, 10:51:28 am »
i usually just call my friend Bruce to come over and help me out.  i don't know what he does to get them on, but when i get back from making a beer run, he's already got them on there, and his clothes are all torn up...

Where can I rent this "Bruce" you speak of?
Not putting miles on your bike is like not having sex with your Girl Friend so she'll be more desirable to her next Boy Friend.

Offline mono

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #13 on: October 25, 2012, 10:56:47 am »
i usually just call my friend Bruce to come over and help me out.  i don't know what he does to get them on, but when i get back from making a beer run, he's already got them on there, and his clothes are all torn up...

Where can I rent this "Bruce" you speak of?

man, he's been hard to get ahold of lately since his accident at work.  to bad too - he was a brillaint scientist.  now he just wanders around doing odd jobs and helping strangers in need.  maybe you'll run into him.  just don't make him angry.  you wouldn't like him when he's angry...

Offline NewOldSchool

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2012, 01:35:17 pm »
Duly noted.
Not putting miles on your bike is like not having sex with your Girl Friend so she'll be more desirable to her next Boy Friend.

Offline disco

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2012, 03:25:07 pm »
Use a ratchet strap & suitably sized piece of timber at back of carbs (for protecting carb throats). Loop the ratchet strap around the front of engine & tighten. Carbs pop right on without a  struggle.
1976 CB750 K6 Sapphire Blue
1972 CB750 K2 836 Orange Sunrise
1972 CB750 K2 Candy Red
1972 CB750 K2 Candy Gold'

Offline Delta869

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2017, 01:46:10 pm »
On my 650Z, I sit astride the bike with it up on the centre stand, place my hands on the carbs with my knees behind my hands and my feet on the pegs.  Push off the pegs with my feet and the carbs pop straight on.  This technique may be a little difficult with the other SOHC4's because the 650Z's pegs are set further back than the factory spot on all the others I have seen.

I just tried this method and it worked great! ... it's nice having a computer in the shop lol

Online Don R

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Re: The lazy man's carb install
« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2018, 08:12:15 pm »
 I grease the boots and carbs with silicone grease, push them on far enough to get them started in the boots. Then place a piece of 2x4 on the carb inlets, insert a tire iron from above through the frame and pry against the 2x4 using the frame as a fulcrum. Make sure they are perfectly lined up and they usually pop right on. A rag will protect the paint on the frame. I broke a K0 carb bracket wrestling them before I tried this.
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