Author Topic: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration  (Read 9519 times)

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Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2012, 09:01:10 am »
Thanks for the comments guys, IW ,i have a small blast cabinet which removes the rust or existing zinc plating, i then wash the item and acid dip for a minute

Here are some tips which i posted on another site

Hi all i have had lots of questions regarding zinc plating and if there are any tips i can give for doing it at home
So here are my tips based on my experiences, please bear in mind i am not an expert , i just enjoy restoring these bits myself, infact if you go to the right places with a job lot of parts to plate it can work out cheaper than doing it yourself, however for me its all about the enjoyment of doing as much as possible myself on the bike restoring , and the convenience of being able to do random parts when ever i want
First thing is to buy a zinc plating kit, i buy all my stuff from gateros plating, http://www.gaterosplating.co.uk/   they are in my opinion the best out there, i will give you an example, i bought a kit from them set it all up , and started plating, i had some really bad results and asked them by email for some tips as to what i was doing wrong, Dan at gateros plating responded to my emails really quickly and talked me through step by step what i should be doing, and also asked me exactly what i had done so he could pin point what was causing my problems, anyway he established that i had contamination in my chemical bath, i have no idea if it was down to me or not but without me even asking he kindly sent me some new chemicals so i could renew the plating bath, and also some new zinc anodes all free of charge, now i  have to say in this day and age that is top notch customer service, and for that reason i will always use and recommend them.
OK when you get your kit ( i use the Zinc/ Nickel kit as it gives better protection) read all the instructions, then read them again and try and get a good understanding of the process, follow it all by the letter don't cut any corners,
Here are the things I recommend you get which are not in the kit, an Amp meter and a box of 100 latex gloves, and several large new clean buckets
Get set up on a decent stable work surface with plenty of room, set everything up as instructed then add your amp meter into the electrical circuit so you can monitor the amps going into the process, this is critical if you ask me as to many amps in relation to the size of the piece to be plated will burn out the brighteners in the solution, and use up the zinc really fast, it also turns the zinc a sooty black colour which has to be cleaned off,
Work out the area of the item to be plated, don't guess, measure it , if for example you are doing a long engine bolt get the length, then wrap a piece of string round the circumference and measure that sting to get width, then x length by width to give your area, i am getting good results at between 80 and 100 milliamps per square inch, i would not recommend going over 100ma per inch
There are many very important things to get right in the process another one is cleanliness, be prepared to use up lots of disposable gloves, as contamination of the various chemicals and parts is easily done, example if you have the same gloves on that you have just passivated a plated item with and you proceed on to plating another piece you will find just touching the newly plated part with your passivate contaminated gloves will give horrible black marks to the zinc which set you right back, have rinse buckets of fresh water available, use a different bucket for each dip, example, when you rinse the freshly plated item and  then passivate, use a different rinse bucket to rinse of the passivate, you have to eliminate all potential cross contamination, ideally have a dedicated sink for rinsing, if not several buckets of clean water and change them after each session
The temperature is also very important , this applies to the plating solution and the passivates, keep them to the recommended temperature, using fish tank heaters
Agitation is very important, some of the kits come with a fish tank air pump which you can use to keep the solution agitated, or you can stand over it gently moving the solution, whatever the method don't ignore this as it all plays a part in getting good results
Keeping the solution clean, again this a must, some kits come with a fish tank filter, but they awkward , and get in the way, what i do now is use an old coffee jug and paper filters, and after every session i filter the solution and return it to my storage tank all clean & ready for its next use.
Keeping the Anodes clean, this also needs to be done , wash them thoroughly and hang them up to air dry , or dry them quick with a hot air gun, the connection from your wire to the anode often gets all firred up and so you could potentially be hanging an anode in the solution which is not making an electrical connection, soldering them is an option or just making sure by that the wire and anode is bright metal and getting a good connection
Properly preparing the item to be plated is of up most importance, you will not get good results unless you do the prep right, ideally you should blast the items in a blast cabinet, but whatever your method  it will need to be rust and grease free,  degrease as detailed in the kits instructions , don't cut corners here or you will regret it
Time in the solution, i plate between 20 Min's and 1 hour depending on the item, if it is say an item that is going to be down there by the wheels and getting lots of road salt then i give it anything up to an hour, other bits 20 Min's is enough  and probably equal to the factory finish
Have plenty of new clean copper wire, and when you reuse the old wire, rinse it off ,get a scotchbrite cloth  brighten up the wire again, i have a reel of old twin and earth i just strip the plastic from it and have a big supply of fresh copper wire , you will find you get through loads
Work in a ventilated area, if you are doing it in your shed or garage, beware that any items of chrome you have might get marks on, IE don't do it next to your pride and joy restored bikes or items as the fumes in the air seem to mark chrome, this is just my experience , and a painfully learned lesson
To recap above
Buy kit
get additional items , gloves , buckets or sink, blast cabinet, coffee filters, amp meter, additional tank heaters, copper wire
Follow instructions with the kit to the letter
Keep everything clean, rinsing, washing anodes, filtering solution etc
Accurately work out the area to be plated
Control  the amps, between 80and a 100 ma per square inch
Use different gloves for different stages
Work in a ventilated area, and wash your hands as often as possible
One last tip, the best results are in spring summer when the outside temperatures are 15 +, i find good  results harder to get in the winter months regardless of heaters, it takes allot more messing around in the cold, good results are still possible just harder

Hope this of help to anyone thinking of doing it
Pete

Offline iron_worker

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2012, 10:33:11 am »
Thanks for all the tips for plating. The tip about keeping your chrome protected is great. Never would have thought of that.

I would have bought from Gateros but they don't ship to Canada so I ended up buying from Caswell. Their kit cost more $ but it seems to be of high quality so hopefully I can get good results too.

IW

Offline slyguy

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2012, 04:14:24 pm »
Hi Pete, Thanks alot for posting your home plating procedures!! I may very well give this a try...once spring arrives ::)

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #28 on: December 07, 2012, 11:18:30 am »
Here are some more bits



The metalwork of the front footpegs was powdercoated, i zinc/nickle plated the pins,and washers, also seeing as new rubber is quite cheap i thought it would be rude not to so they got finished off with the new rubbers








Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2012, 01:40:17 am »
Here are the pictures of my frame and various bits after they had been to the powder coaters,
and  Yes  i did sneak in the background some of my other SOHC's

I sent the frame swingarm and battery box back as i felt the finish was quite poor compared to when i last had one done, this is the photo of the parts first time round you cant see the finish clearly




Here is one when i got them back after being re-done, i am much happier now


Offline dhall57

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2012, 02:32:22 am »
Great work Pete ;) Was interested in seeing a before picture and info on this KO, where and how did you find it,etc.

thanks
dhall
1970 CB750KO
1971 CB500KO-project bike
1973 CB350G- project bike
1974 CB750K4-project bike
1974 CB750K4
1976 CB750K6
1977 GL1000
1997 Harley Wideglide

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #31 on: December 09, 2012, 05:37:26 am »
Hi dhall, i have been looking for a K0 for about 3 years, i have looked in all the usual places but eventually found this one on ebay, it was quite expensive, but what swung it for me was the fact that lots of the original parts were on it and usable, also the engine ran and was sounding ok
here it is when i got it


Offline iron_worker

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #32 on: December 10, 2012, 07:00:19 am »
I did the very same things to my foot pegs this weekend as well. ha

IW

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #33 on: December 17, 2012, 01:28:24 pm »
I restored  the the seat catch,  was really pleased how it  came out, its another small bit to tick off the list





Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #34 on: December 19, 2012, 12:13:11 am »
Another busy weekend on the bike, made myself up a long plating tank so i could do the long things like engine bolts, and brake rod, then plated the brake rod
below is it just out the tank before passivating




I then spent all of yesterday prepping the engine cases, and spraying them, let them dry overnight , then oven cured the paint , the good thing now is i can proceed to check all the bits and rebuild the engine bottom






Offline iron_worker

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #35 on: December 19, 2012, 07:06:16 am »
Some good work going on in here.

Also looks like I'm slippin behind! lol

IW

Offline Garystratos201

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #36 on: December 19, 2012, 08:23:47 am »
I`m wishing now that I had painted my cases. Oh well too late now.lol...........Gary
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Current ride; Bass boat.... 2005 Ranger 521VX,250 hp Mercury Verado, super charged and direct fuel injected. Not a bass on the lake can out run me !!!

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #37 on: December 21, 2012, 09:00:11 am »
I have gathered all my engine component markings, and have read other peoples posts on date markings,  what i can gather is 44 is the year 1969 and the next two numbers the  month and day, as i am documenting the whole build i might as well gather all my date markings together, it really pleases me that the bottom of this engine was totally untoched, the top had only had the head off, everything that was put together in 1969 is in tact and re-usable, obviously i will replace all the usuall serviceable items


Clutch basket 01/10/1969


cam carriers the  07/10/1969  first 4 is partly worn away




Rocker cover  29/8/1969


Crank cases  26/09/1969

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #38 on: December 23, 2012, 01:41:30 am »
Gathered the bottom end parts together, took them apart and gave them a good clean and inspection, i have to say the condition for 43 years is amazing, very little wear, the only parts that need replacing are the primary chain tensioner and cam tensioner wheels as these are rock hard and starting to loose bits off them,and of course the chains will be replaced, i will change the output shaft outer bearing even though mine is smooth running and reusable, i am only changing it as i had already ordered the new bearing before checking the old




Output shaft has had an easy life by the looks


Started putting the parts together and back in the engine, it took me about 5 minutes to remember the easy way of reinstating the kickstart spring, i was scratching my head for ages trying to remember how the f--k  i did it last time, i put in the new primary chain tensioner,



Then the rest of the parts



It will stay like this for a while, till i get the rest of parts for the engine build, nearly there though, i have recieved most of the parts i ordered here they are , just need gaskets and a few more orings

Offline ivanhoew

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #39 on: December 23, 2012, 01:53:58 am »
nice!
just do it .

Offline dhall57

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #40 on: December 23, 2012, 03:31:30 am »
Hello Pete. Keeping track of your project. Great work by the way, looks like by the detail of your work this isn't your first rodeo. I have a 4/70 Candy Blue Green KO that I got lucky and found several years ago and it's still near original except for a few changes by the PO. It's no show bike just a good every day rider and in good shape to be about 43 years old. Watching you makes me tinker with the idea of someday doing a full restore on it just like your doing on your KO now. But I live with old saying on these old Honda's if it ain't broke don't fix it and I just fixed and replaced what was needed on mine to make it save and reliable for the road. Was your KO like mine just needing some TLC but instead your going all out with a complete restore and engine rebuild. Would you engine been fine left alone or did it so some signs of needing to be gone through.

dhall

Well I see by some of your earlier post you had some bad oil leaks, so I guess that explains the engine tear down.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2012, 03:58:09 am by dhall57 »
1970 CB750KO
1971 CB500KO-project bike
1973 CB350G- project bike
1974 CB750K4-project bike
1974 CB750K4
1976 CB750K6
1977 GL1000
1997 Harley Wideglide

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #41 on: December 23, 2012, 04:04:04 am »
Hi Dhall, i like to leave good original bikes as they are, but with the K0 it needed the engine taken apart as it was pissing out oil plus it was cosmeticaly very rough, the whole bike was painted black and quite badly, also all the suspension needed work, the frame needed painting so i decided on a nut and bolt restoration, i want the bike to look like new when i have finished, also if done well enough it will be worth some money for my retirement fund
I have a real nice unrestored K1, this will probably stay unrestored as i just love the patina,
your right i have done this before, each time i do a bike i try to do it a bit better than the last, it is a big learning curve but really enjoyable
Here is my F2 i restored a couple of years back



 My k1 in unrestored condition

Offline dhall57

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #42 on: December 23, 2012, 04:31:18 am »
Nice pics ;) Here's my KO right after bringing it home in 2011 and a recent picture.

1970 CB750KO
1971 CB500KO-project bike
1973 CB350G- project bike
1974 CB750K4-project bike
1974 CB750K4
1976 CB750K6
1977 GL1000
1997 Harley Wideglide

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #43 on: December 23, 2012, 05:46:10 am »
Thats a great looking original bike Dhall, its hard to see from the 2nd picture but have you changed the rear wheel back to original size?

Offline dhall57

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #44 on: December 23, 2012, 06:08:44 am »
No Pete still has the 16" Harley wheel. I put tires on it of course right after getting it, so when these need to be replaced I'll go back with the 18" stock size rim on rear. The PO also had replace the original carbs with later 750 carbs, and also have black grooved airbox instead of KO box and different bars. Everything else is original, duck tail seat, HM300 pipes (been patched up in a few places though) and ribbed KO tank and original side covers. Not a show bike like I said, but just a nice rider. I'm happy with it.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2012, 06:15:52 am by dhall57 »
1970 CB750KO
1971 CB500KO-project bike
1973 CB350G- project bike
1974 CB750K4-project bike
1974 CB750K4
1976 CB750K6
1977 GL1000
1997 Harley Wideglide

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #45 on: January 08, 2013, 11:38:13 pm »
Wish me luck as i am starting my gauge restoration, it is amazing just how much money there is in getting hold of a decent set of restored gauges, even the cost of home restoration on old gauges is high, with the potential to f--k it up as well
Anyway here goes
Many thanks to Marcel for suppling the gauge covers and face plates

First of all snap of the rear plastic lip



Next carefully prise off the needle, this is the part where i wonder if i should be doing this myself


I got myself a small philips screwdriver which fitted the two face plate bolts and removed them, to reveal  beautifully preserved internals, even the light shaft rubber boots were intact and looking good,


The damping all seems fine, so i dont think there is much else to do in here, so i stick the the new jewels to the new face plate


Dab of paint on the needle tip, put it all to one side , let the paint dry and i come back to it for reassmbly later

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #46 on: November 14, 2014, 01:42:57 am »
Ok so here are pictures of the gauges back together, there is still more work to be done, i will put new shrink tubing on the wiring, as it is getting a bit hard , also i wont seal up the bottom with silicon until the clocks are up and running on the bike, other than that here they are for know, all the hard work done











The rear chrome plates are ok but not perfect, thing is that the replacement ones from Honda are not the same as the originals, so its either keep as is , rechrome or replace with modern alternative


Here are the originals



here is an original left, next to the new style  right


Offline dhall57

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #47 on: November 14, 2014, 02:28:25 am »
Hey Pete. Good to see you back on the KO after a little break. Great work on the gauges. AAA job ;) Need to take my KO tach apart, the needle wants to bounce around at 5 grand and above. The clutch could be replaced, but did some adjusting on it and it does better, but I know its just a matter of time.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 02:32:14 am by dhall57 »
1970 CB750KO
1971 CB500KO-project bike
1973 CB350G- project bike
1974 CB750K4-project bike
1974 CB750K4
1976 CB750K6
1977 GL1000
1997 Harley Wideglide

Offline UK Pete

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #48 on: November 14, 2014, 05:15:55 am »
Hey, i am sorry i have not updated on here, on another site i am quite a few posts ahead of this, i have several other posts to bring this up to date, so even though this seems like a new post it was actually copy and pasted from the uk forum where i am a bit further advanced with the build, i will post a few more updates to get up to speed
pete

Offline Johnie

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Re: 1969 Diecast/ K0 restoration
« Reply #49 on: November 14, 2014, 01:39:09 pm »
Nice job there Pete. I got the same gauge cases from Marcel and the plastic is a bit thinner than OEM so once I put the gauges into the holders I could not tighten them down. So I had an old pair of gauge cushions and I cut the ribs off. Wrapped them around the new cushions and that built it up enough to tighten it down. Marcel said I should use electrical tape to thicken them up, but when that tape gets hot it tends to get soft and slide. Keep up the good work.
1970 CB750K0 - Candy Ruby Red
1973 CB750K3 - Candy Bacchus Olive
2000 1500 SE Wing (wife's pearl white bike)
1970 Chevy Chevelle SS396 - Cortez Silver

Oshkosh, WI  USA

 

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