Author Topic: Marissa's 1972 CB500  (Read 17584 times)

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Offline RAF122S

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #325 on: December 15, 2018, 09:59:47 pm »
You can get chromate conversions in clear which sometimes gives you the blue finish, a yellow chromate, and the black chromate conversion.  Zinc plated is good enough for the carbs and you are not going to be exposing it to tons of corrosives. Fellow in Canada who rides his bike in the winter, it is a winter hack with sidecar and enclosed canopy for the side car goes through fasteners every few years but the bike's fasteners were just zinc'd without chromate conversion.
David stuck in the curvy back roads of "Upper East" TN

Offline seanbarney41

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #326 on: December 16, 2018, 12:42:22 am »
Damn, so glad all these respected people spoke up.  Let those carbs act their age.  The INSIDES have to be clean.
If it works good, it looks good...

Offline DaveBarbier

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #327 on: December 16, 2018, 05:46:13 am »
I’m not sold on the mains needing to go up to 125. My 550 had 110’s with pods and velocity stacks. I honestly didn’t feel any difference going from UNI pods to stacks. But either way, it would be really nice if you went to a dyno to help tune. There’s a really great guy in New Milford and it’s a beautiful ride up there. It’s like $65 for three pulls and the guy loves older bikes. He did a few extra for me. I went to him a handful of times. He doesn’t know carbs all that well and he doesn’t tune your bike, he mainly does the electronic programming tuning stuff. But just having the graph and knowing what the a/f ratio is at a given throttle position is very handy.
John Dyno Solutions
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Also, email Dmitry Slootskin. He’s a vapor blaster in RI I think. dslootskin@cox.net
He did my 650 stuff and is very reasonable. It came out slightly more matte than I’ve seen but show him a picture of the finish you want and he’ll get you going.
My vapor blasted clutch cover on the left. My patina treatment to the shift cover on the right.


That rotor cover looks very nice! I like the patina personally, maybe that’s obvious...


Offline RAF122S

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #328 on: December 16, 2018, 02:16:02 pm »
It seems everyone has a little different mix on vapor blasting and results can vary greatly between different "blasters" ;) 
Nil's seems to have a following on here as his work is consistent and unlike many others I have seen. I think I like what Nils does best of everything I've seen. But, I have a polishing addiction I sometimes feed, so vapor blasting will not give you patina....like polishing removes a lot of patina.  You seem to like patina you can control like an artist, am I right?

Maybe pick up a spare cover from someone...a cover that needs some help cosmetically so you can play around with parts that are not your bike's parts but could be used on your bike if you figure out a technique to get your desired look.
Scotchbrite pads give some patina to parts that a wire brush will definitely give a brushed look. Unless using expensive (rotary...as in grinder, bench buffer/grinder, etc.) brass brushes.  Glass beading give a different look depending upon size of bead and sand blasting can give you a very pitted surface if you go too coarse on the grit.  Vapor blasting has the advantage over glass bead that it peens the surface which gives it some protection that ages slowly as long as you aren't exposing it to winter salt and leaving that corrosive substance on the bike.
Vapor blasted surfaces can be left natural without the aluminum splotching and oxidation variation that shows up on a sand blasted or glass beaded surface.

Most vapor blasters will not reveal what their slurry is that they use to blast parts with...the wet blasting changes the way a blast media reacts with the material.
David stuck in the curvy back roads of "Upper East" TN

Offline HondaMan

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #329 on: December 16, 2018, 02:22:42 pm »
M:
About those 'spots' on the slides: I just polish it off. I start with Scotchbrite, then 3000 grit paper if needed, steel wool, or the like. They just need to slide smoothly in their carb tunnels. The 500/550 carbs are notorious for warping those tunnels, making them stick the slides above 1/2 throttle, and 2000 grit will push the warped portion back enough to make them smooth again, too.
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Offline 754

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #330 on: December 16, 2018, 06:11:31 pm »
I have 12 inch scotchbrite wheels, give a good brushed finish.
They are out there, but hard to find the proper name. . I think deburring wheels or linishing  I think it was .
 Kbc has them in the cataloge, but a big hard to find cause the  proper name.
 I found mine on ebay. Had a quick look , not easy to find.
 The ones that look like  a grindstone , are everywhere but expensive.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2018, 06:17:15 pm by 754 »
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Offline Cb750 Racer

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #331 on: December 16, 2018, 09:04:23 pm »
I’m not sold on the mains needing to go up to 125. My 550 had 110’s with pods and velocity stacks. I honestly didn’t feel any difference going from UNI pods to stacks. But either way, it would be really nice if you went to a dyno to help tune. There’s a really great guy in New Milford and it’s a beautiful ride up there. It’s like $65 for three pulls and the guy loves older bikes. He did a few extra for me. I went to him a handful of times. He doesn’t know carbs all that well and he doesn’t tune your bike, he mainly does the electronic programming tuning stuff. But just having the graph and knowing what the a/f ratio is at a given throttle position is very handy.
John Dyno Solutions
203-470-5458

Also, email Dmitry Slootskin. He’s a vapor blaster in RI I think. dslootskin@cox.net
He did my 650 stuff and is very reasonable. It came out slightly more matte than I’ve seen but show him a picture of the finish you want and he’ll get you going.
My vapor blasted clutch cover on the left. My patina treatment to the shift cover on the right.


That rotor cover looks very nice! I like the patina personally, maybe that’s obvious...

Thank you for the referral. He'll definitely be getting a call this spring once I finish up the Turbo billet block cb, 65$ for 3 runs is hard to beat and I have a good feeling he'll like what I bring by  :D

 Strange you didn't have to change jetting when you switched to the velocity stacks they must have had some pretty fine screens. 125 may be a bit large I gauged the mains off a buddies big bore 592. The pilot/needle position should be close regardless but a dyno session will certainly tell you better info on your specific application than me
1972 Honda CB750 AAMRR Racer
1972 Suzuki GT750 Project
1975 Honda CB400f
1981 Kawasaki KZ750 LTD
1984 Kawasaki GPZ550 =>610cc
1996 Honda CR500

Offline Marissa

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #332 on: February 10, 2019, 03:21:27 pm »
Hey everyone,

Just wanted to give a quick update:

I am still working on the bike and making progress with smaller bits. I've been really busy with school and I haven't had too much motivation to work in the freezing temps on the weekend.

Unfortunately, Flickr sucks big time. I exported a lot of my photos since Flickr is clearing out photos that exceed 1000+ on free accounts. Because I'm a cheap college kid, I went through most of them as I don't plan on paying $50 to do the same thing I used to all these years, and I think Google Photos is free unlimited anyways.

Long story short, since Flickr never really worked right/or fast with loading the pages or scrolling through images, I guess my photo count didn't update even after I refreshed it 5 times and come to find out most of my forum images were deleted when I didn't have to delete that far back.

So yeah. Now my build page sucks big time. Really sorry about this.

I still have these photos on my computer, but I personally don't think it's worth relinking every single one. At some point, I would like to go through it and reupload general photos that cover the gist, but for now this build page is ruined and I'm real upset lol.

I hope to have *new* photos to show you guys soon!

-Marissa
1984 Nissan 300zx - sold
2016 Ford Fiesta ST - daily
1972 Honda CB500 - infinite work in progress

Instagram- marissasimos

Offline RAF122S

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #333 on: February 10, 2019, 04:54:00 pm »
You can upload directly to the site if you wish to keep the thread active and viable, rather than using Flicks or Photo_ucket...
David stuck in the curvy back roads of "Upper East" TN

Offline PeWe

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #334 on: February 10, 2019, 09:58:44 pm »
I always upload direct to the post. Photos compressed to around 80-200kB, sometimes a little more if needed.
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Offline MauiK3

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #335 on: February 11, 2019, 08:02:52 am »
I upload directly too, have to watch file size.
Keep up the good work, school is more important of course but your build is food for the soul. I was just wondering if you were still on it. Good to hear you are out there, stay warm!!
1973 CB 750 K3
2009 Ruckus!

Offline RAF122S

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #336 on: February 11, 2019, 02:17:47 pm »
Marissa is an artist, thus she is wired to have and need creative outlet. Classes are doing this some But, wrenching and building the bike scratches a different itch...
David stuck in the curvy back roads of "Upper East" TN

Offline Bankerdanny

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #337 on: February 11, 2019, 08:11:23 pm »
I upload directly too, have to watch file size.
Keep up the good work, school is more important of course but your build is food for the soul. I was just wondering if you were still on it. Good to hear you are out there, stay warm!!

The photo size limit was upgraded a little while back to 4mb, more than enough for a high res photo. I never bothered with photobucket or other such sites before and there definitely isn't any reason to use it now.
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Current: '76 CB750F, '74 CB550k project bike, '77 CB550F basket case engine donor. Previous:  '75 CB550F, 2007 Yamaha Vino 125 Scooter, '75 Harley FXE Superglide, '77 GL1000, '77 CB550k, '68 Suzuki 80 (K11 probably, it's been 30 years), '68 Yamaha YR2, '69 BMW R69S, '71 Honda SL175, '02 Royal Enfield Bullet 500, '89 Yamaha FJ1200

Offline DaveBarbier

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #338 on: February 12, 2019, 04:37:49 am »
Definitely a bummer, I host most of my photos on the tapatalk app. Hope I don’t run into the same problem eventually.

Offline Marissa

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #339 on: February 16, 2019, 04:41:28 pm »
You can upload directly to the site if you wish to keep the thread active and viable, rather than using Flicks or Photo_ucket...

RAF, how do you do so? So far I've tried clicking the "insert image" option, pasting in the image address in, and no luck lol. I'm completely inept at these things haha.
1984 Nissan 300zx - sold
2016 Ford Fiesta ST - daily
1972 Honda CB500 - infinite work in progress

Instagram- marissasimos

Offline jgger

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #340 on: February 16, 2019, 08:54:24 pm »
I just hit the attachment button below the text box in reply. Ezpz!

Offline Marissa

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #341 on: February 17, 2019, 01:11:09 pm »
Jggr,

That's a great way of going about it. I tried using the image gallery for the first couple of posts but I had to condense all my images to upload.

Anyways, here's my progress. For now I'll add the rest of the photos I have in Flickr that I've been stashing away for this update.

I thought about the feedback you guys gave me, and I realized I could just have my boyfriend paint the carbs at work. So we took one of the prismatic powder samples that I picked out and he was able to recreate the texture and get the tone pretty close. But I haven't given him the carbs yet so that's that.



The nutserts Ive been using from the local hardware store are total junk, so we used an astro pneumatic at work with the nutserts that came with that and those are now in the seat pan for the hinge. I also recovered the bottom of the pan.





I've been working on making a new steering stem. It's probably just going to be decoration and I probably won't end up using it but:







Looks like there was some deformation in the wax burnout process. I'm going to throw it on the lathe at school to clean it.

I refinished the side cover and extra fuse holder I made.







I sized down that ring I made, but I found out the improper fitment was actually from the weight of the handlebars pulling the ring back



I hung out at Madhouse Motors in Boston over winter break and got to help prep the RE Indian (Foot Throttle) for the unveiling at the New Tradition Motorcycle show. The show was super cool and the building was killer. It was mainly about old school choppers, mostly Harleys, but it was so badass and a very authentic show.









Super cool stuff. In CT, we don't have much of a scene like this.

As some of you may know, Dave did a fork upgrade on his bike, and he actually offered me his old 550 set up. This couldn't have worked better as now I don't have to worry about that sketchy damper rod that I "fixed", and it seems 550 forks have a few more part options. These fork tubes are also nearly mint which is awesome! And, now I have a dual disc assembly. Sure hope I never grab that brake lever too hard, lol.

The infamous Patina Hyena!



The black oxide was just not going to work on my bike, sorry Dave  ;) So I sanded them down, and filed the rough casting edges down to clean them up.









Working on polishing them up. Also, here's a visual comparison of 500 vs 550 forks. The lower bodies are taller, but the actual whole fork assemblies seem to be the same height. I remember when I was looking into this and getting confused by the info I found, so I hope maybe this is helpful to someone. And yes I have the wrong side fork held up to the right side, but you get the idea. Thanks again Dave!







That's pretty much it for now. I'm likely going to convert to clip ons and do something with the triple tree and gauges, not sure what yet though. I truly love the OE gauges and what not.
1984 Nissan 300zx - sold
2016 Ford Fiesta ST - daily
1972 Honda CB500 - infinite work in progress

Instagram- marissasimos

Offline DaveBarbier

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Re: Marissa's 1972 CB500
« Reply #342 on: February 17, 2019, 02:32:05 pm »
Hey, I recognize that bike :) And you can see frost on my tank and everything, haha.

Nice! Yeah, do something with those lowers. Black oxide wouldn’t work on your bike.

 

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