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Author Topic: Fuel Tank & Petcock FAQ  (Read 18393 times)

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cjackel

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Fuel Tank & Petcock FAQ
« on: March 28, 2005, 10:34:53 am »
I wanted to report the results of my purchase and use of Safest Rust Remover. It's about $132 per 5 gallon bucket (includes shipping). It's basically the same chemical as Rusteco except half the price. It's advertised in Hemmings Motor News and on
the web. The website is www.safestrustremover.com.

It's non-toxic and biodegradeable. No harmful fumes. Doesn't damage paint or skin. And it doesn't
dissolve metal, so no need to Kreem or coat the tank because the remover doesn't eat metal.
IF the rust is so bad that you have pinholes, you will probably need to coat but if your tank is
relatively good shape with only surface rust then you're in luck.

I drained the gas and removed the gas tank from my 1978 CB750K. The inside of the tank was rusty and I was told
by the original owner that is was previously coated, but he didn't know what was actually done.

I removed the petcock and filled the tank with warm water and simple green. I rinsed the tank and plugged it
a foam ear plug and duct tape.

I filled up the tank with the rust remover. I put the gas cap back on and let it sit on my bench.

By day 2, the tank coating was peeling off like slime inside an aquarium.

The gas cap chain was rust free and I could start to see "new" metal on the tank surface.

By day three, the entire tank looked new and the old coating was floating in pieces like
seaweed.

I drained the tank and rinsed with warm water to remove the pieces of coating.

I filled the tank back up with the rust remover and let it sit overnight.
I drained the remover and sucked out the excess with a wet vac.

I installed the petcock and put 2 gallons of gas in. I picked up the tank
and sloshed the gas to coat the entire tank.

I reinstalled the tank and put a Fram gas filter in between the petcock and carb line.

I poured in a half a bottle of water remover and filled the tank at the gas station.

The tank looks brand-new and not a spot of rust. No need to coat with Creem or
similar product as the gas will keep it rust-free as long as I keep it topped off.

This is the way to go if you have rust in your tank. I highly recommend it. I'm not
a salesman or dealer, just a happy SOHC owner with a nice gas tank.

Offline SteveD CB500F

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Re: Fuel Tank & Petcock FAQ
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2005, 12:56:11 am »
For anyone looking for custom metalwork, Uncle Ernie suggests a visit to www.metalshapers.org

It's a board (like this) for enthusiasts and there are some cool motorcycle albums.  Members are in US and Europe, so something for everyone.
SOHC4 Member #2393
2015 Tiger 800 XRT
1972 CB500/4 (Goldie)
Dionysian Divagation (Steve's Blog)

Offline SteveD CB500F

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Rust in your Tank ?? Try POR-15
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2005, 01:34:41 am »
Most people on this board seem to rate this stuff - these sites include comment and instructions (with photos):

www.por15.com

www.frost.co.uk/how_do_i.asp  (UK distributor)

This is from Tintin:

Don't know how many of you have done this, or are thinking about it.  Thought I'd share my experience here.

Overall I'm VERY happy with the kit and result.  The instructions could have been more explicit, but with a little searching on the web you'll find a few more detailed versions and stories.

Step 1: Marine Clean - super degreaser.  Removes gum/varnish etc.  Basically you mix this with boiling hot water 1:1 ratio (makes 2 litres total) and dump into your tank.  You can use your petcock on this step.  I didn't have one, so I sealed my petcock with a chemical-proof rubber glove I bought years ago.  Cut the pinky finger off and then cinched it tight around the petcock mount by twisting wire around it.  Don't know what I would do on a different tank with the hole for a petcock to bolt to.

You swish it around and let it sit in different positions for 24+ hours.  I did mine for 30 hours.  Don't neglect the top of the tank.  Let it sit upside down (seal the filler hole) for a good long time too.

Drain and flush out with water.  Get it pretty dry after this.

Step 2: Metal Prep - acid.  Rust remover / zinc coater.  This step is quicker - 30-45 minutes.  Seal up the petcock again.  Dump the stuff in full-strength.  Swish it around and let sit like in step 1 but for less time.  Some people put nuts and bolts in to knock rust loose.  I didn't.  If you have a long magnetic tool used to fish parts out of engine blocks, then you'll be in good shape to remove stubborn nuts and bolts.

Dump the stuff.  It says you can use it again.  For the $10 the bottle costs, I wouldn't bother.  What came out of my tank resembled coffee.

Rinse rinse rinse.  Then DRY DRY DRY.  Lots of moving air.  I used my shop vac on blow for a while, and then my wife's hair dryer on and off for a couple of hours.  At times the tank was hot.  You don't want ANY moisture in there at all.  Don't trust your eyes.  If you think it's dry enough, put the hair dryer on for another 30 minutes.

Step 3: Liner - Tiny little tin of what looks like silver metallic paint.  Again, seal the petcock.  Dump in the liner - make a paper funnel for this out of construction paper or something.  Snip a hole in a coffee filter if you have one.  Whatever the paint touches will have it on it forever.  Seal the filler hole.  Rotate the tank slowly to cover all areas.  Keep doing this over a 40 minute or so period at least.  You'll have to drain the excess.  This isn't easy on some tanks (including my 550) because the floor of the tank is flat, and the petcock has a raised area around it.

One thing.  I wrapped my entire tank in plastic before doing Step 3.  The tank was well sealed off except the filler hole and the petcock.  Masking tape is good for the liner sealing.  No rubber gloves needed to seal here.  Don't put masking tape on your tank directly - you're likely to peel your paint, especially candy top coats that are 30 years old.

This was important as you will invariably end up with the liner on your fingers, and you have to handle the tank a lot.  If you get the liner on anything, including the exterior of your tank, it will be there FOREVER.  I painted the lip of my filler hole with the stuff as you can see in the pics.

Here's a couple of pics of the finished liner.  Sorry I didn't get more 'during' pics, but Steps 2 and 3 are constant activity type things.

Allow 3-5 days for the liner to cure before putting fuel in it.

Do this in a WELL ventilated area (Step 3).  The stuff emits some serious fumes for days.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2005, 04:41:03 am by SteveD CB500F »
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1972 CB500/4 (Goldie)
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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The Electrolysis Method for De-Rusting your Tank
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2008, 12:27:41 pm »
From Heironymous Josh:

I found the below article referenced on the kneeslider.  It seems like a hell of a way to remove rust from the fuel tank with electrolysis.  Thought it might be a good add to the Fuel Tank & Petcock FAQ.  I'm curious if small battery "tenders" will work for this application.

http://650rider.com/index.php?name=Content&pid=6

Josh
SOHC4 Member #2393
2015 Tiger 800 XRT
1972 CB500/4 (Goldie)
Dionysian Divagation (Steve's Blog)

 

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