Author Topic: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)  (Read 3441 times)

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Offline minimo

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Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« on: August 30, 2018, 07:44:15 pm »

Any questions?


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Offline BobbyR

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2018, 10:22:32 am »
Wow that sucks. I would invest in some Tygon which you can get from small motor repair shops. The overflow tubes don't need to be anything special since they rarely see fuel. The primary fuel lines need to be fuel resistant. Tygon is great to work on. Nobody needs that thick rubber line since there is no real pressure in those lines.
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But we were boys, and boys will be boys, and so they will. To us, everything was dangerous, but what of that? Had we not been made to live forever?

Offline WhyNot2

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2018, 10:48:49 am »
Wow that sucks. I would invest in some Tygon which you can get from small motor repair shops. The overflow tubes don't need to be anything special since they rarely see fuel. The primary fuel lines need to be fuel resistant. Tygon is great to work on. Nobody needs that thick rubber line since there is no real pressure in those lines.

Yes that does suck, specially when it happens on miltiple bikes.

Whats the size needed for a 750k and 350f.

Both have carb and fuel line issues.
If it ain't raining, I'm riding.....~~{iii}?~~prost

If it sounds like I know what I'm talking about, it's because I cut and pasted from someone else.

Offline minimo

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2018, 10:57:23 am »
Yeah, this Home Depot cheap clear vinyl tubing was good enough as a “get me there” but it would not hold up for the amount of rides I got out of it. I think it was the combination of the fuel that altered the characteristics of the vinyl mixed with the heat around the carbs and engine area that finally gave way and literally cracked the vinyl. Luckily I was not far from home to make it back home safely.

I have replace the line with a fuel-rated type.


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Offline minimo

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2018, 08:10:27 pm »
WhyNot2, ID should be 1/4”.

Here’s some fuel rated line with an interesting note on fuel containing more than 10% alcohol:
https://4into1.com/helix-clear-pink-red-1-4-polyurethane-fuel-line-by-the-foot/

1/4" (6mm) Internal Diameter
7/16" Outer Diameter

Helix Fuel line is a premium polyurethane, 85 durometer, which provides for superior abrasions and kink, tear, oxidation and chemical resistance. Melting temp 370f Operating temp -75f to 155f This fuel line will not get hard, stays flexible. Not to be used with fuel containing more than 10% alcohol.


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Offline seanbarney41

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2018, 12:49:14 am »
WhyNot2, ID should be 1/4”.

Here’s some fuel rated line with an interesting note on fuel containing more than 10% alcohol:
https://4into1.com/helix-clear-pink-red-1-4-polyurethane-fuel-line-by-the-foot/

1/4" (6mm) Internal Diameter
7/16" Outer Diameter

Helix Fuel line is a premium polyurethane, 85 durometer, which provides for superior abrasions and kink, tear, oxidation and chemical resistance. Melting temp 370f Operating temp -75f to 155f This fuel line will not get hard, stays flexible. Not to be used with fuel containing more than 10% alcohol.


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ok, bunch of incorrect info here...if you got an sohc4 you need 5.5mm id fuel line which is somewhere between 3/16" and 1/4", so if you use 1/4" and it is actually flexible, you gonna have leaks.  Use 3/16" if you are not buying Honda oem.


"Do not use with more than 10% ethanol"?...basically says that it is useless garbage.  Majority of U.S. gas stations are pumping 10% (or more) ethanol right now...god damn corn mongers are pushing for year round federally mandated %15 right now

So you are gonna need some better fuel line unless you want to replace it every other day...I have not used Tygon but guys have liked it for years.  Motion Pro has excellent stuff (what I have been using for the last several years).  Or oem Honda 5.5mm...or that thick walled stuff from the auto parts store
If it works good, it looks good...

Offline minimo

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Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2018, 07:44:14 am »
Thanks, seanbarney. 1/4” ID if you don’t mind using hose clamps

Per Wiki on Tygon Tubing:
Quote
Tygon Fuel and Lubricant Tubing F-4040-A is translucent yellow for positive identification and flow monitoring. It is used in small engine fuel lines, recreational vehicles, and lubrication lines.


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Offline TwoTired

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #7 on: September 01, 2018, 09:07:07 am »
5.5mm is correct, which converts to 7/32".

The only 7/32" tubing I could find at auto parts stores was vacuum line.  The rubber formulation on vacuum line varies among manufacturers some are fuel resistant, some degrade/ disolve with gasoline contact.  Put an inch of it in a jar with gasoline and wait to see what happens to it.

Me?  I went to the honda shop and bought a few feet of bulk 5.5 mm fuel line tubing.

Whoda thunk stock stuff could actually work?

Cheers,
Lloyd... (SOHC4 #11 Original Mail List)
72 500, 74 550, 75 550K, 75 550F, 76 550F, 77 550F X2, 78 550K, 77 750F X2, 78 750F, 79CX500, 85 700SC, GL1100

Those that learn from history are doomed to repeat it by those that don't learn from history.

Offline minimo

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #8 on: September 01, 2018, 09:08:44 am »
Stock is always nice, most notably Honda stock.


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Offline BobbyR

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #9 on: September 01, 2018, 09:35:12 am »
Wow that sucks. I would invest in some Tygon which you can get from small motor repair shops. The overflow tubes don't need to be anything special since they rarely see fuel. The primary fuel lines need to be fuel resistant. Tygon is great to work on. Nobody needs that thick rubber line since there is no real pressure in those lines.

Yes that does suck, specially when it happens on miltiple bikes.

Whats the size needed for a 750k and 350f.

Both have carb and fuel line issues.

I have used Tygon for years and would not fart around with anything else. Find a place that services tractors and small engines and bring a piece of that stuff you were U using for sizing. Tygon is very flexible but not easily kinked, it is self clamping and I mean it holds hard so no worries about vibration and you don't need clamps. You can find it on Amazon if you use that.

Dedicated to Sgt. Howard Bruckner 1950 - 1969. KIA LONG KHANH.

But we were boys, and boys will be boys, and so they will. To us, everything was dangerous, but what of that? Had we not been made to live forever?

Offline Stev-o

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2018, 09:51:22 am »


Whoda thunk stock stuff could actually work?


Too easy!   

Some would rather buy cheap crap to save a dolla [but then end up spending more when it needs to be prematurely replaced]

'74 "Big Bang" Honda 750K [836].....'71 Honda 750K project.....'76 Honda 550F.....K3 Park Racer.....K5 Fiddy Dolla Special!......and a Bomber!............plus plus plus.........

Offline minimo

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2018, 10:05:56 am »


Whoda thunk stock stuff could actually work?


Too easy!   

Some would rather buy cheap crap to save a dolla [but then end up spending more when it needs to be prematurely replaced]
True that, Stev-O! I’m not done until I’m convinced


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Offline TwoTired

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2018, 10:45:08 am »
Wow that sucks. I would invest in some Tygon which you can get from small motor repair shops. The overflow tubes don't need to be anything special since they rarely see fuel. The primary fuel lines need to be fuel resistant. Tygon is great to work on. Nobody needs that thick rubber line since there is no real pressure in those lines.

Yes that does suck, specially when it happens on miltiple bikes.

Whats the size needed for a 750k and 350f.

Both have carb and fuel line issues.

I have used Tygon for years and would not fart around with anything else. Find a place that services tractors and small engines and bring a piece of that stuff you were U using for sizing. Tygon is very flexible but not easily kinked, it is self clamping and I mean it holds hard so no worries about vibration and you don't need clamps. You can find it on Amazon if you use that.

You found Tygon in 7/32" I.D?
Which formulation are you recommending?
https://www.professionalplastics.com/TygonTubingProducts?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIw7bjga2a3QIVgeNkCh1ILg6YEAAYASAAEgLuF_D_BwE

Cheers,
Lloyd... (SOHC4 #11 Original Mail List)
72 500, 74 550, 75 550K, 75 550F, 76 550F, 77 550F X2, 78 550K, 77 750F X2, 78 750F, 79CX500, 85 700SC, GL1100

Those that learn from history are doomed to repeat it by those that don't learn from history.

Offline minimo

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2018, 10:50:22 am »
Oh, and also allow my experience to be a reminder to always turn your petcock/fuel valve OFF when you park and leave your bike unattended for some time.


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Offline BobbyR

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2018, 01:15:35 pm »
Wow that sucks. I would invest in some Tygon which you can get from small motor repair shops. The overflow tubes don't need to be anything special since they rarely see fuel. The primary fuel lines need to be fuel resistant. Tygon is great to work on. Nobody needs that thick rubber line since there is no real pressure in those lines.

Yes that does suck, specially when it happens on miltiple bikes.

Whats the size needed for a 750k and 350f.

Both have carb and fuel line issues.

I have used Tygon for years and would not fart around with anything else. Find a place that services tractors and small engines and bring a piece of that stuff you were U using for sizing. Tygon is very flexible but not easily kinked, it is self clamping and I mean it holds hard so no worries about vibration and you don't need clamps. You can find it on Amazon if you use that.

You found Tygon in 7/32" I.D?
Which formulation are you recommending?
https://www.professionalplastics.com/TygonTubingProducts?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIw7bjga2a3QIVgeNkCh1ILg6YEAAYASAAEgLuF_D_BwE

Cheers,

The 3/16 works very well Lloyd.  Whynot you will be fine with the Tygon. Lloyd sometimes forgets his manners in his zeal to be absolutely correct.
Dedicated to Sgt. Howard Bruckner 1950 - 1969. KIA LONG KHANH.

But we were boys, and boys will be boys, and so they will. To us, everything was dangerous, but what of that? Had we not been made to live forever?

Offline TwoTired

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2018, 05:13:15 pm »
To my knowledge, Tygon is a brand name, and not a specification.

I expect you are referring to the F 4040A formulation of Tygon.

There are more than 2 dozen formulations of Tygon tubing, as exemplified by the link I posted.  Some are NOT gasoline compatible.

3/16 does stretch/stress the tubing more than desired when placed over nipples expecting 5.5mm.
I've not seen Tygon tubing last 40 years.  I have seen it harden in other gasoline environments, needing replacement, possibly from the alcohol contamination in the gas.  I have seen Honda spec tubing last that long and still function well.

I use Tygon tubing in my r/c models that use gas engines.  It works fine there, imo, as well as in the yard equipment I have.

I don't understand what manners have to do with component/application specifications.  Inanimate objects don't care if they work or not.

Cheers,
Lloyd... (SOHC4 #11 Original Mail List)
72 500, 74 550, 75 550K, 75 550F, 76 550F, 77 550F X2, 78 550K, 77 750F X2, 78 750F, 79CX500, 85 700SC, GL1100

Those that learn from history are doomed to repeat it by those that don't learn from history.

Offline 1976cb750f836

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Re: Fuel line (fuel-rated Vs. not)
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2019, 11:00:18 am »
Benn using Tyson several years. I was a wholesale small engine parts salesman. Bout 3 years is max I get out of it if ridden, and left in sun for part of its life. This is with our new blended fuel.
Back when gas was gas, I got 5-6 years out of it.
Just my experience.