Author Topic: General FAQ  (Read 39470 times)

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AndreRA3

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General FAQ
« on: March 28, 2005, 01:54:33 PM »
Just thought that I would let you guys know that I just installed a few L.E.D.s on my 74/78 CB750...  Here are my first thoughts:

I bought the L.E.D.s from these guys: http://www.superbrightleds.com/led_prods.htm

I fitted Ba9s bulbs on the dash (the 4 led kind on the neutral and high beam, and the "frosted bulb" kind for the blinkers).  I got the leds the same color as the lenses (green for neutral, amber for blinker, etc...), and they are BRIGHT.  Much brighter than the filament bulbs I had in there. BTW, so far both kinds seem equally bright, but I'm not sure.

I also fitted an 1157 24 bulb red L.E.D. on my brake light.  This is the led with 18 bulbs facing the rear and 6 radially mounted.  This is dimmer than the filament bulb I had before, but it's noticeable during the day.  At least in the shade, since that's where I was able to check it (while I got gas).  I'll test it for night time brightness tonight, but I expect it to be more than good enough. I'll also see how well it lights up the license plate (since it was the running light that did that before, but now the running light is red (and a bit dimmer).

Just for kicks (and because I had broken a front turn signal), I put some LED turn signals from Cyclegear on my baby.  I found these by accident, and luckily they are the same shape as my old signals (NOT STOCK).  Here's a url for you guys (but I bought mine from a store). http://www.cyclegear.com/spgm.cfm?L1=&L2=&L3=&L4=&item=FAI_BD14D-U0080B-L_G  (BTW, they look like these, but with clear lenses http://www.cyclegear.com/spgm.cfm?L1=&L2=&L3=&L4=&item=MRX_OI1_G )  These are also dimmer than a filament bulb, but definately noticeable during the day time. (They are clear and blink amber)

Why did I do all this, you ask?

Well, I've been having some electrical problems lately (i.e. since I bought this bike) so i figured I would cut back on as much battery usage as possible.  I just replaced both my stator and field coils (with used parts) , and took it for a quick ride (2 miles to get gas :) )  I checked voltage at the battery and it seemed to be charging well, so I have reason to hope.  Anyway, soon I should have a Kuryakin battery gauge installed as well, and I'll give you guys a quick review of that...

BTW, this forum seems a heck of a lot better than the old one...

André

« Last Edit: October 17, 2006, 10:02:00 AM by SteveD CB500F »



Offline Harry

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General FAQ
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2005, 03:40:36 AM »
What year (or model) is my bike?
Check the “Bikes” link at our website: www.sohc4.us, or try www.honda4fun.com
For CB750, try Axl's website: www.satanicmechanic.org/enginemods.shtml
For all Hondas, go here and look up your model:  http://100megsfree4.com/honda/

How much is my bike worth?
Hmmm. Much less than it would/will cost to restore it. www.honda4fun.com has some prices, otherwise search eBay and follow the auctions there.

Should I take a classic like this on the road?
Buying an old bike means embarking on a rolling restoration. Each season you will improve your bike. You will amass a store of parts, probably an engine also. Around you, more and more parts will be produced as pattern parts. In around 5 years (10, 20?) your bike will be perfect (not over perfect, just perfect). In 50 years it will also be perfect. Your 8,000 mile bike will now be a 200,000 mile bike. You see, once a classic gets into the hands of an enthusiast, it doesn’t matter if its done 8,000 miles or 200,000 - the point is that part of the pleasure for us is maintaining and rejuvenating our machines. Expect to restore your bike maybe 4 or five times in your life, very basically when your young and poor, more detailed and originally when you’re older. Bikes aren’t human; they don’t wear down and die! Get out there and enjoy!

What books / restoration guides are available?
IMO, the best is "Original Honda CB750", by John Wyatt. Very good photographs and very detailed information.
Then, "Honda CB750" by Mick Duckworth, and "Honda CB750" by Mark Haycock. These three are great restorer's guides with all the details, dates, numbers of production etc. (thanks Raul CB750K1)

Why is my ignition key under the tank?
This is clearly to give the rider the chance to pay homage to the SOHC powerhouse by bowing low, caressing the fuel and engaging the spark - all part of an ancient and honourable Japanese tradition!

« Last Edit: November 16, 2007, 05:41:24 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Divided by a Common Language
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2005, 03:05:12 AM »
Can't remember who said this first (Winston Churchill?) - but I'm sure someone out there does.

FAQ suggested by jonesdp:
Bike - related phrases only I think (at the moment)

(UK)           (US)           (ES)
Fuel Tap - Petcock - grifo de gasolina
Winker - Turn Signal - intermitente
Pannier - Saddle Bag - alforja
Gudgeon Pin - Wrist Pin - pasador
Petrol - Gasoline - gasolina
Tick Over - Idle - ralentí
Gauze - Filter - filtro
Silencer - Muffler - tubo de escape (muffler/exhaust)
Pillion - Passenger - asiento de copiloto
Clocks - Gauges - instrumentos
Spanner - Wrench
Tyre - Tire
Works - Factory
Carburettor - Carburetor
Top Yoke - Triple Clamp
Bottom Yoke - Triple Clamp

And finally "f!@#$%g" = Aussie description of CB750 Alternator Rotor...
« Last Edit: November 09, 2005, 05:59:46 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Motorcycle Maintenance 101
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2005, 07:09:13 AM »
A good start for the beginner:

www.dansmc.com/indexindex.htm

and another:

http://oldmanhonda.com/MC/RHints.html

Thanks to Bob Wessner and Jeremy
« Last Edit: June 16, 2005, 07:10:59 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Cleaning Chrome
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2005, 04:14:58 AM »
Interesting angle on cleaning up those crappy old exhausts.

www.vjmw.org/workshop/chrome_cleaning.htm
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Offline Harry

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Cost of rebuilding a 550 by Tintin
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2005, 10:31:06 AM »
Cost of rebuilding a 550 by Tintin

This might be a handy reference for anyone interested in rebuilding a CB550F.  I've included Honda part numbers where applicable.  Kind of dangerous thing to keep around - makes you question your sanity, but, still, $2,500 total cost for a rebuilt, wonderful classic bike isn't too bad 

ItemQuantity Unit Price Total Part Number
Spark Plugs (two sets so far)8 $4.50 $36.00 98069-57711
Air filter replacement1 $38.04 $38.04 17210-390-003
Breather filter gasket1 $5.24 $5.24 17351-374-003
Breather filter1 $3.78 $3.78 17352-374-003
Left Sidecover Sunrise Orange with decal1 $32.00 $32.00 Honda
Right Sidecover Sunrise Orange with decal1 $130.00 $130.00 Honda
Sidecover grommets top (4)1 $22.44 $22.44 17247-303-000
Sidecover grommets bottom (2)1 $3.72 $3.72 83551-300-000
Throttle Cable A1 $32.45 $32.45 17910-300-040
Throttle Cable B1 $26.12 $26.12 17920-323-000
Clutch Cable1 $13.99 $13.99 22870-374-000
Left control switch (headlight) repair / replace1 $67.00 $67.00 35200-390-671
Right control switch (start button) repair / replace1 $97.00 $97.00 35130-377-670
Speedo Cable1 $11.00 $11.00 44830-390-000
F-3 #14 Tachometer Cable1 $13.94 $13.94 37260-390-000
Keyster Carb Kits4 $25.00 $100.00 Keyster
E-2 #7 Carb Insulator4 $9.36 $37.44 16211-323-000
F-15 #12 Band A Connecting Band2 $4.22 $8.44 17255-323-000
F-1 Right Grip1 $11.20 $11.20 53165-342-670
F-1 Left Grip1 $9.41 $9.41 53166-342-670
F-12 #7 Tank cushion front2 $5.90 $11.80 17611-283-010
F-3 #29 Guage hex nut-caps4 $0.90 $3.60 94021-06020
F-4 #23 Handlebar clamp2 $7.88 $15.76 95014-22200
F-20 #12 Rear Shock Hex Nut2 $2.96 $5.92 90309-315-000
E-2 #21 Pin dowel 10x16 for valve cover2 $1.36 $2.72 94302-10160
F-16 #6 Exhaust Protector Band A1 $5.24 $5.24 18326-390-000
F-16 #7 Exhaust Protector Band B1 $5.24 $5.24 18327-390-000
F-16 #10 Bolt Hex 6x251 $1.02 $1.02 92025-06025
Muffler gasket1 $20.00 $20.00 Honda
Starter Solenoid Replacement1 $28.75 $28.75 TO Cycle
Airbox Breather Tube1 $9.36 $9.36 17335-323-000
NOS Brown Vinyl Seat (minus $50 sale of old seat)1 $32.50 $32.50 Honda
Gasket replacement Top and Bottom1 $45.00 $45.00 Aftermarket
Cosmetic Exhaust joint cover1 $18.35 $18.35 18325-390-000
Kickstart Rubber1 $2.71 $2.71 28311-329-000
Shifter Rubber1 $0.97 $0.97 95011-40000
Kickstand Rubber1 $5.24 $5.24 50548-356-700
Cam chain slipper1 $40.18 $40.18 14520-323-000
Cam chain guide1 $18.52 $18.52 14611-323-000
Piston Rings4 $-    $-   ART 555cc
Piston4 $30.00 $120.00 ART 555cc
Wrist Pin4 $-    $-   ART 555cc
Clip8 $-    $-   ART 555cc
Cam chain1 $35.50 $35.50 14401-323-003
Tach drive oil seal1 $3.87 $3.87 91211-286-003
Tach drive washer1 $0.77 $0.77 91309-035-000
points2 $30.00 $60.00 109 Cycle
condensors2 $20.00 $40.00 109 Cycle
oil bolt1 $15.00 $15.00 Emgo
Labour for carbs / tuning5 $70.00 $350.00 109 Cycle
Labour for engine rebuild top end3 $70.00 $210.00 109 Cycle
« Last Edit: October 18, 2005, 06:01:45 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Bike Buying for Newbies (thanks Geeto67)
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2005, 06:01:14 AM »
Here are my "rules" (if you could call them that) for newbie motorcycling buying:

1) Research: figure out what kind of bike you want. Narrowing it down will keep you focused. If you know what kind of bike you are going to look at, merely posting on a message board is not enough (although it is a good start). Get out there and read old road tests, enthusiasts sites, books on motorcycles (Roland Brown's book on the history fast motorcycles is a good at a glance for most bikes). By now there is at least one webpage dedicated to every motorcycle ever made, read what they have to say (yes all of it) about your particular bike. If you can go to a few bike shops and ask some of the techs if they have them, have ever worked on them, and have any advice. make a checklist based on this info. Then you are ready to go look. Never commit to a bike you know nothing about.

2) Always be able to ride the bike: License or not, get you arse on the seat and ride it. If you have never ridden before, get a friend who has to ride it for you. Don't take the seller's word for it riding, ever. It isn't because they might put one over on you but more because someone who is used to the bike may not notice problems. For example my clutch adjustment was off on my cb750. It had been going over time and I never noticed it, until a friend wanted to borrow the bike for his road test. He stalled the bike 4 times in a block (he is an experienced rider, just not used to my bike). At that point it became obvious that the clutch needed adjustment, but I never noticed because I was so used to the bike.

3) Find someone who knows about motorcycles and take them with you to look at any bike. As a newbie you aren't going to know how to spot what you are looking for. It is always good to have someone with you who you can trust to answer your questions.

4) Figure out the need the bike fills in your life. If it is a toy and you are giving up eating for a week to have it you may want to rethink the decision. Never put youself out for a motorcycle - it can't feed you (unless you are a pizza delivery boy) and it can't shelter you.

5) Approach this with a plan. So far In my life I have had a cb360 in the back seat of a blazer, a t500 in the capped bed of a pickup, a honda dream in the trunk of a Pontiac grand am rental car, a cb750 in an 1986 Cherokee, and a cr125 strapped to the roll bar of a wrangler. In all of those scenarios (except the blazer) I have ended up covered in gasoline. The lesson learned is to make sure you have a plan for getting the bike home and cared for once you get it. This means budget for a possible trailer rental (or at least lunch for a buddy with a pickup) and a cover. Also budget for a manual, and some tools.  

6) Buy the most complete running motorcycle you can afford. Project bikes fior a newbie are the equivalent of pissing money into the wind. Get something you know you can at least ride the next day. Needing minor tune up stuff is ok (battery, plugs, etc) but any weird engine noises means stay away. Any bike will break often enough in your life that you will need to fix it (even a brand new Japanese bike), you'll get your experience. Cosmetics don't really matter so long as the bike is mechanically sound.

7) Size up your seller. If he looks like the kind of guy who was doing doughnuts in the parking lot an hour before you may want to pass. Get the seller talking about adventures on the bike and telling stories...that will give you an idea about what kind of life the bike led in their care.  

There is more but I am tired of writing. Good luck. Remember don't be afraid to ask questions, and always listen.


More

There's another good write-up here:
www.clarity.net/~adam/buying-bike.html (thanks to cb750fbomb)
« Last Edit: July 02, 2009, 01:39:59 PM by SteveD CB500F »
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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What is a "Sandcast"
« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2005, 08:34:03 AM »
The first 7414 CB750 K0's had sandcast engine cases.  Since no other company had this type of bike in production Honda did not want to go through the expense of Die Pressure casting the motors till they were sure they would turn a profit with them.  The Sandcast motors are all gravity type castings with inexpensive sand molds.  Once they realised production was going to take off after the first several months of produciton they made the dies.

The K0 sandcast engine #'s are E1000001 thru E1007415

This from "Toycollector10" on the differences between a "Sandcast" and a "K0":
1.   Cut front guard
2.   Concave hydraulic reservoir
3.   Butterfly wingnut on throttle cable
4.   24 inch chain guard
5.   Un-finned oil filter housing
6.   Un-stamped pipes as against the HM300 pipes that came later. Upper right hand doesn't have an indent for brake travel.
      Fewer baffles in the exhaust. Made for a meatier and louder sound. Free'r flow and more horsepower and noise.
7.   The headder flange has 11 instead of 13 fins
8.   Plasic instead of glass on the tacho and speedo. Tacho red-lines at 8500 rpm versus 8000 on later models
9.   K0 and Sandcast weigh 218 kg. K1 went to 235. Slower, quieter, heavier
10. Ducktail seat on the first 70,000 bikes (I think)
11. Some esoteric stuff about left versus right hand mounted horn
12. Sandcast and K0 don't have 'Turn' above the indicator switch
13. Sandcast has a cast metal gas tank filler on top as against a pressed steel, also has a screw that holds the vent in place as against
      a rivet. Sandcast and K0 have a wider tank, different profile.
14. Mirrors on a Sandcast and K0 are 104 MM diameter versus 114 MM diamete on K1 onwards



More info here:  www.cb750sandcastonly.com   Includes history, pictures, links and registry of known owners with serial numbers
« Last Edit: January 26, 2006, 08:24:28 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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What does "CB" Stand For?
« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2005, 08:45:15 AM »
There have been various answers over the years.
Here's a few from the archives:

City Bike - quite a popular choice

Cool Bike

Chris' Bike

CB comes from the Japanese words "Cobasha - Biokeosan" meaning "Combustion Bicycle".

Also:
"K" stands for "Kairyo" or "Improvement". So, K1 would mean Improvement #1 (jonesdp)
"F" stands for "Four", or "Faster" (?)


I know for a fact that GXSR means "organ donor" - Evil Don...

« Last Edit: October 21, 2005, 03:35:57 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Make Your Own Rearsets by Ohiocaferacer
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2005, 09:10:29 AM »
Here is an old post I had placed on some other forums on making universal rearsets to fit the older Honda CB's. Most all the CB (twins and inline 4's) Hondas have 1" diam. frame tubes and this works great. I posted this a long time ago......thought i'd repost it here.

This is the setup i'm using on the CR350 racer and i'm now see some of the vintage road racers using this setup.....enjoy!!

Very easy and functional way to get some very nice rearsets for most cafe bikes with very little metal fab or machining.

1. Purchase 4......universal 3-Piece 1 inch frame clamps from Dennis Kirk(800-323-9280), part number=h27-036.......$5.99ea.

2. Need to look on EBAY for 1998-2002 Honda CBR929RR/RC51 rearsets....usually run approx. $80 per set. You will need the
rearset brackets (right & left), both heel guards, shift lever, & rear brake lever with return spring (and brake light switch if using a taillight). You can usually find all these together as a set or with only a few parts missing or damaged. I have purchased a few sets with road rashed pegs for very cheap. Usually, you can purchase some aftermarket pegs from the local bike shop for around
$20.

3. Purchase some smooth round rod (have to thread ends) or threaded rod ($1.57 for 3 foot piece...approx) from local hardware store to fab up the shift and rear brake linkages. I have always purchased smooth round rod, then once cut to size.....threaded the ends using a tap/die set.

4. Depending on application, you may need to use a spacer between the frame clamps and the rearset mounting braket. On my CB350's I have used a 1 inch aluminum spacer to locate the peg out away from the swingarm for clearance.

I have some pics on my website of these rearsets being used on my 1972 Honda CR350 and also on my 1970 Honda CB350RR Inverted front fork hybrid.

Feel free to visit the site at:

http://www.OHIOCAFERACERS.com

These rearsets have worked great for me, hope this helps for you cafe projects.

Greg

Below is an old pic of the rearsets during mock up:
 


 
« Last Edit: November 30, 2005, 09:15:41 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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CB750 Handling in a Nutshell (thanks Hondaman)
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2006, 11:55:40 AM »
I've often been asked, by those who've ridden mine, why my 750 "feels" like a much smaller bike. Yours can be made to "feel" like the hotrod CB450 with 750 power by doing these things.

#1. Replace the steering head bearings (little balls and tracks) with VERY HIGH QUALITY tapered roller bearings. DO NOT use the Japanese or other oriental ones: use Timken. There IS a significant performance difference. And, set them up slightly tight, as they will wear in after about 500 miles.

#2. Replace the rear swingarm bushings with tight-fitting, oil-impregnated bronze bushings. Change the oriental-style grease zerk fitting(s) with US-style zerks so the grease can actually be forced into the bushings. Lube those bushings generously when assembling them, and use new felt seals when you do.

#3. Get Timken or Reynolds wheel bearings for the front wheel (2 each) and the rear (3 bearings back there). They cost nearly 3 times as much as the oriental ones, and they are worth every cent.

#4. All of the CB750K-K5 models I have seen have the "optional" steering head damper mounts. Get one from Fox or a BMW shop and install it. Set the damping to medium for startup, then adjust to suit when you get used to it.

#5. Tires. Use ONLY ribbed tire pattern in the front of a CB750K2- or later model. You can get away with a blocked pattern on a K or K1 model, because they don't "shake their heads" during deceleration. A ribbed front tire pattern helps make the bike run more stably under most street conditions, and it does not "wash out" suddenly in corners. The rear must be a symmetric pattern, preferably a block pattern. The new "sideslash" patterns on today's crotch rockets will cause sideways drift under heavy acceleration on wet (or slick) surfaces with the 750 geometry. Sizes: K5 and earlier: front must be 3.25 or 3.50 by 19". Rear is usually 4.00x18, some later ones had 17" rears and should be 4.50x17. IF YOU USE TT tires, use the 4.10x19 front and 4.50x18 (or 5.10x17) rear, AND ON BOTH ENDS. DON'T use a TT on one end only, and DON'T use them for heavy touring loads, they'll be all over the lane. These tire size combinations preserve the already-short 3.25" trail on the front end of these bikes, as well as the load rating. Larger rear tires will cause wobble, every time, because they shorten the trail.

#6. For those of you who have short inseams: your first choice should be to install 12" length rear shocks. Get 110-lb straight-wound or 90/120-lb progressive springs. If you install "lowering blocks", you will get a VERY stiff rear suspension, because the increased cant of the rear shocks will not allow them to compress over bumps. Shy away from those blocks. After installing these shocks, lower the front triple clamps about 1/2" on the front forks.

#7. Use teflon-mixed oil in the front forks. Get teflon-coated seals that are slighty shorter in length (1/4" instead of the stock 5/16" to 3/8" stock units). These will "float" up and down slightly between the top of the fork retainer and the upper C-clip, which makes them seal better and respond to minor road irregularities MUCH better. Install the optional steel washer ABOVE the seal (good kits include these washers). Drill and tap the fork caps and install threaded Shraeder-type air valves (found at tires stores, used on mags), one in each fork. Run about 10 PSI pressure if riding single, 15-20 if carrying heavy loads.

If you do ALL of these things, you will not believe the difference the next time you hit a corner. It will feel like the bike lost 100 lbs somewhere...   ;)
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Honda Part Numbers - What do they mean ?
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2006, 03:33:50 AM »
This document and links provided by Richard Hykawy
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Adam said:
These numbers (8.8 and 10.9) Refer to the metal the bolt is made from....

Scunny said:
Steel grade 8.8---Made from medium carbon steel and zinc plated. Best for general hardware use where high strength is not required. Standard metric thread pitches
Steel grade 10.9---Made from alloy steel quenched, tempered, and zinc plated (usually yellow). Best for automotive use and other areas where high strength is needed.

Clyde said:

The numbering system is an ISO standard and slightly different to the American grading system.
The numbers are used to calculate the tensile and yield strength of a bolt.
They work in mpa instead of psi, as the numbers use metric units.
The 8 refers to an ultimate Tensile Strength of 800mpa which is roughly equivalent to 120,000psi. The second 8 is used to give the yield stress and is calculated by multiplying the two numbers together (8X8) and then multplying by 10 to give 640mpa or 92000psi
Check the following site out as it gives a better explanation

www.obex.co.za/data4.html

A even better site which gives both the ISO and American gradings is:

www.boltdepot.com/fastener-information/Bolt-Grade-Chart.aspx
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1979 CB900FZ
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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How to Install Tapered Head Bearings
« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2006, 02:34:40 AM »
Take a look here: Installation with Pics

Thanks for this link go to Stephan (Einyodeler)
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Classic Bike Dossiers on CB400 and 750
« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2006, 02:39:47 AM »
Classic Bike is a UK mag that specialises in the 60's (like Classic & Motorcycle Mechanics specialises in the 70's)

They do allow their magazine to "overlap" sometimes and have pdf "dossiers on the 400 and 750 Hondas.

Check them out:  Classic Bike Dossiers

Thanks to Gar for this link.
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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More on LED Lamps
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2006, 10:02:39 AM »
Bodi wrote: (Oct06 on the subject of LEDs)

The only bulbs that will make a difference are those that are on all the time - the headlight, tail light, and marker lights. Turn signals take a good shot of power, but are on so rarely that they won't affect charging.

Usually we want a brighter headlight so a lower power one is undesirable. LED headlights are coming but there aren't any yet.
Marker lights can just be disconnected, saving almost 15 Watts of power (0.6A each). If you really like the markers you should get LED conversions.
The tail/stop light uses another 1157 bulb, 7W on tail and 32W on stop. You can't eliminate the tail/stop lamp obviously. The stop light is only on occasionally but it's usually on when stopped and idling with the lowest alternator output. Reducing these loads will help maintain battery charge.
For the tail/stop lamp you need a really bright bulb; that's why the 1157 takes almost as much juice as the stock headlight low beam. You want the stop light to be very noticeable even in bright sun.

I have tried many LED lamp conversion clusters and found them to be dim, dim, dim, and dimmer - adequate at night but dangerously dim in sunlight. I have not tried the www.customdynamics.com 38mm cluster claimed to be the brightest cluster made.
I am using the www.superbrightleds.com Luxeon Star single LED 1157 replacement 1157-RLX3 in a standard Stanley large tail light unit. It is astoundingly bright, stunning at night and more than adequate in sunlight. Even with a single emitter there's enough light bounced around inside the reflector and lens to light up the license plate to an almost legal level (I think white light is required to be legal). It seems strange that one LED is brighter than an array or 30+ LEDS but it is. I'm certain this would beat the www.customdynamics.com guarantee challenge.

The single LED is not applicable to the marker/turn signal units - you need a right angle LED unit. I have been unable to find a conversion 90 degree LED cluster with enough light to be useful so I just disconnect the markers and use the stock filament bulbs for turn signals. They take 50W or so when flashed ON but as mentioned that load is very infrequent. You can get complete LED marker/signal units and mount them somehow; making a complete assembly with adequate light is MUCH easier than making a conversion lamp to work with the stock lens and reflector.
Using LED turn signals will disable the stock flsher, it needs the higher load current from filament lamps. Adding "compensators" defeats the power saving of LED lamps - they are load resistors that draw the power a normal lamp would and just heat up. Just install a 3 wire electronic flasher and the LED signals will work with very little extra power draw. (The 3-wire flasher uses a bit of power to operate whereas the 2-terminal stock flasher uses the lamp power without any extra load)

More from Bodi (March 2008)

The newer high efficiency LEDs make a lot of light from not much power. Using different materials and processes in the LED chip the light wavelength can be almost any visible colour, pretty far into the invisible IR end of the spectrum, and a bit past visible in the UV end. A LED chip will produce a very narrow colour spectrum - not quite a single wavelength but close enough to be equivalent visually.
White LEDs come in two types; multichip and phosphor. Multichip have 3 or 4 different colour LEDs in the same package, balanced to give a white looking light. Phosphor ones have a UV LED behind a phosphor blob that glows with a whitish light, actually a mix of phosphors with different colours that makes white much like the multichip version. The effect can be seen on a TV screen - close up you will see green, blue, and red spots but farther away these blend together to look like a single colour.
There are different approaches to either optimize "whiteness" - so colours look similar to how they would look in daylight, or to optimize luminous efficiency - the amount of light produced for the electrical power used.
The red tail-light lens blocks all wavelengths shorter than about 600nm (orangish red) - light from the bulb that's anywhere from oranger to blue is blocked and effectively wasted. A standard tail light bulb is a true "black body" radiator which radiates from long wavelength deep infrared all the way to a colour that is dependent on the filament temperature, with radiated power dropping off rapidly below that wavelength.
All filament bulbs - black body radiators - have plenty of light at wavelengths longer than their "colour temperature" rating, so a tail light will look plenty bright with any "white" filament bulb. There are exceptions where phosphor coatings and special gases in the bulb are used, but standard tail-light bulbs won't use these tricks.
Not true with a white LED. Mutichip types will be wasting the chips that aren't red. Phosphor ones will be wasting the non-reddish part of their spectrum. I'm trying to attach a spectrum for the Luxeon 3 white (phosphor) LED. You'll see (hopefully) that there's a fair bit of blue and a lot of yellow but a big drop from yellow-orange towards red.
So you will be pumping 3 watts of power into it and getting maybe 1/8  of the actual light from the LED seen as red through the tail-light lens.
If you use a luxeon 3 red (direct radiating) LED, all the light produced will be passed through the lens.
This is true for any white LED, it's a waste of power and a dimmer end result than using a red LED. Adding a white one pointed at the license plate will keep you "legal", but the actual tail/stop function should be red. Same for signals, amber LEDs will be brighter than the same power & efficiency white one.
I tried a lot of LED 1157 replacements and found them all woefully dim regardless of marketing hype, so I decided to make my own conversion.
I bought a bunch of red and white LEDs planning to make a multi-LED tail/stop light panel that will fit into a Stanley SOHC4 tail lamp with red for the tail/stop part - with side lighting too - and white license illumination. There are a few design decisions and the thing is NOT as simple to design as I had originally though, but hopefully I'll get it done. Unfortunately I found the Luxeon red single LED 3W 1157 replacemnt... it's definitely bright enough from straight back in daylight and more than sufficient at night from all angles with the stray light bouncing around inside the lens. The license is actually well lit, although an illegal red. I'm happy enough with this that I haven't done any serious work on the LED panel but I have been working on the electronics to drive the LEDs at full power over a decent voltage range and have the dim/bright ability for tail/stop use. I've hooked up a pulsed circuit recently that looks brighter than "full power" - you can overdrive a LED quite a lot in pulsed mode as long as the total power over time is below the rated maximum (like giving it 400% of maximum power for 25% of the duty cycle), and we apparently see the brighter pulses but don't notice the darkness between them. I noticed that many buses and trucks use pulsed LED tail lights - easy to see if you move your head around while looking at them as they leave a trail of dots rather than the line from an always-on one.
So I don't recommend white LEDs, is the basic message... got carried away with the ranting again.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2008, 05:22:47 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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BurmaShave on fitting LED Indicators (Nov06)
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2006, 02:13:38 AM »
The first pic is from the tips on the Custom Dynamics site.

1) Get LED clusters listed in my post above.

2) Remove the turn signal assemblies from the bike.  Replace any suspect wiring.  It'll be much harder to fix any wiring once the LED's have been affixed. 

3) Open the assemblies, remove the bulbs, and give the inside of the buckets a wipe.  I wiped them out with alcohol, too, in order to ensure good adhesion.



4) Insert the LED bases in the receptacles.  Twisting the LED cluster around will allow wire to relax into the bucket.  Remove the adhesive backing tape from the clusters. 



5) (Imagine that there is no foam in the pic above, and that the LED cluster is not pushing up against the tape.)  Using 2" gaffer's tape (or duck tape), make a tight cross over the top of the bucket.  Then, stick your fingers through the holes and pull the LED cluster up so the top of the cluster sticks to the tape.  Note that I set the clusters a bit off center because the base/socket sort of creates an obstruction

6) Set or prop the buckets so the tops are level.



7) Use Great Stuff foam to set the clusters in place.  The can comes with a nozzle.  Insert the nozzle into the openings left by the tape.  Get the nozzle under the LED cluster and carefully squirt the foam until it just touches the bottom of the cluster.  Keep the can upright and shake often.



8) Let the foam cure overnight, and remove tape.  Cut excess foam away with a razor knife. 
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1979 CB900FZ
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Offline SteveD CB500F

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Sources for Honda OEM Part Numbers
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2007, 08:05:22 AM »
This is from mdurkin and well worth a place in the FAQs:

Here is a Honda part number resource for newbie’s to our forum.

I follow a lot of eBay auctions and I notice that sometimes folks pay a premium (plus shipping) for OEM Honda parts that are still available from their local Honda shop or an on-line discount Honda Dealer.

You should always find your part number and check the cost and availability from Honda prior to bidding on an EBay item. (you might be surprised)

Here are five firms that offer Honda parts fiche and/or discount Honda parts:


MotoGrid

http://www.honda-factoryparts.com/pages/home/default.aspx

Click the Honda Motorcycle parts link at the top of the page and you are presented with two ways to look up part numbers.  The box on the left is the traditional - Year/Model look-up parts list.

The box on the right is unique; I have not seen it at any other Honda parts site.  Type in a part number from you bike – in this case I typed in the rear rim from my 1976 CB750 – 42701-300-013 and you will get a list of every model by year that used this particular part number – pretty cool!

42701-300-013 1969 CB750K0 Rim, Rr. Wheel   
42701-300-013 1971 CB750K1 Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1972 CB750K2 Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1973 CB750K3 Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1974 CB750K4 Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1975 CB750F Rim, Rr. Wheel
42701-300-013 1975 CB750K5 Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1976 CB750F Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1976 CB750K Rim, Rr. Wheel         
42701-300-013 1979 CB750K Rim, Rr. Wheel




Crotch Rocket:

http://www.crotchrocket.com

Plus - Easy to use Fiche

Plus – You can print our drawing, part numbers and prices. (very nice – I have made an entire catalog for my 750K6)

Plus – You can open a drawing in a second large window, however you can not print from this new view.

Plus – Offers discount.



Power Sports Pro

http://www.powersportspro.com/

Minus  - You have to be a registered user to use their parts look-up system.



Service Honda:

http://www.servicehonda.com/

Plus – This is probably the closest setup to an actual Honda dealer (never worked at one, but I pay attention to the parts guys when they check my part numbers)

Plus – You can click on an individual part and go to a sub-screen that tells you which K versions the part will work on.

Minus – difficult to use and you will need to install a Plug-in to complete the connection to the parts fiche.



Zanotti Honda – Harley Davidson

https://www.zanottimotor.com/shopping/partLookUp.html

Minus – no parts fiche

Plus – on-line discount pricing and ordering


Also try www.cmsnl.com (grumburg)
« Last Edit: March 26, 2007, 03:51:42 PM by SteveD CB500F »
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Dionysian Divagation (Steve's Blog)



Offline SteveD CB500F

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LED Indicators for 400/4 by Bodi
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2008, 03:30:02 PM »
Why? No more burned out bulbs, less power draw (trivial, really - the signals are not ON much).

Really, I was at Princess Auto (I think Harbour Freight is pretty much the same stuff in the USA) and I saw these marker LED units for four bucks each:



with this stuff included, a marker light and plug-in wiring harness, you can see it is two inches diameter:



This was my turn signal assembly:



and this is what was inside:



with the reflector easily unscrewed:



and the lamp assembly accessible. Note the lamp unit is grounded via a contact strip that touches the shell (at bottom):



leaving the empty shell. I cut off the bullet connector so I could remount the lamp easily if I decide to (easier to reattach a bullet than to splice the wire). If you cut the original wire right at the lamp socket, you can use it for the LED array, I chose to use a new wire. Empty shell, just needs a washing:



The amber cover has to be broken off the LED marker, it's glued on. This reveals the inner workings. The chromed plastic reflector array is pretty neat, but isn't needed in the Stanley housing:



The module, front view showing the circuitry (three strings of three LEDs and the diode bridge) with a conformal coating that keeps moisture out:



And the rear with two bullet females and the twist-in mounting adapter:



Now to test fit. You can see that the module fits really nicely but can't see that it sits flat on four pins in the Stanley housing. You may be able to see that the centre LED is a bit off centre - the module hits the housing where the mounting part meets the housing:



The LED module has a circuit board set in a plastic shell. The shell has to be trimmed a bit to centre the middle LED, so that the light pattern is optimized when the lens is fitted. I used large side cutters, you could file it for a cleaner edge:



Trimmed:



Now the middle LED can sit dead centre with the module sitting flat on the four pins:



So now for wiring. The module has a diode bridge built in so polarity is unimportant. I cleaned out the bullet females in the module with a Q-tip then soldered on the wires. The included harness has a white wire with a nice ring terminal that will attach using one of the reflector mounting screws:



The power wire has to go through the grommet in the Stanley housing before soldering.. if you forget then you'll be redoing it:



Now pull the power wire back and arrange the wires so the module will sit down on the pins. Then you have to hold it in - I decided to glue it in with black silicon rubber. You could just clamp it down, I had to make clamps anyway to hold it down and centred while the rubber set. The clamps would have to be better to really hold it firmly without the rubber though, these are just a temporary fixture. Both the shell and module should be cleaned thoroughly before gluing - I used pure isopropyl alcohol:



Clamped down with silicon applied:



Inner workings complete, the ground wire connected with one of the original reflector mounting screws:



Now for the real test! With the lens attached and 14V DC applied, the light is quite bright but not as bright as the original bulb. I have no way to indicate in a picture or objectively measure the brightness, but it's quite visible in daylight.



I have a 3 terminal electronic flasher so the reduced load doesn't kill the flashing. The flasher does, however, go to a fast-flashing speed meant to tell you that a bulb has burnt out. I like this fast flash - I think it's more attention-getting than the normal speed.

Anyway.. eight bucks and two days (the rubber needs several hours to set) and I have LED rear turn signals. If I come across a way to convert the front units and preserve both the marker and signal functions, I'll post it too (unless this get mercilessly flamed as useless information).

Dave
« Last Edit: May 01, 2008, 06:00:20 AM by SteveD CB500F »
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2012 Tiger 800 Roadie
1972 CB500/4 (Goldie)
1979 CB900FZ
Dionysian Divagation (Steve's Blog)



Offline SteveD CB500F

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Mix 'n Match or "will a xxx from a 19xx CBxxx fit my 19xx CBxxx??"
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2008, 09:20:52 AM »
This must be one of the most oft asked questions on the forum.

To help, we have assembled the combined wisdom of the old timers as to useful web references:

This is from BryanJ

http://www.motogrid.com/pages/parts/viewbybrand/7/default.aspx

Look up the parts on the left hand side then put the part number into the right hand side and it will tell you what bikes it fits on so you can rummage in breakers to your hearts content

From RxmanGriff:

1. http://www.servicehonda.com/TSWeb/default.htm (I'll use my bike as an example)
2. connect (if connect isn't "clickable" - tools - internet options - security - custom - enable or prompt the ActiveX stuff then refresh
3. continue yes
4. click on little book (Open Catalogue) in upper left hand corner
5. Honda & OK
6. Motorcycle & OK
7. Select model from drop down list CB750 & OK
8. Select CB750F from drop down & OK
9. Select KO 750 Super Sport & OK       NOW YOU'RE IN
10. I use Parts Reference Window selected to the right of the little book. This gives contents, schematic & parts   list all on 1 screen
11. Click on Search on the line above the little book
12. Where Used (under Search) - you can either enter a part  number here or find your schematic, highlight the part number then go to Where Used and when the part number is in the part number line click OK - BINGO
13. Now, to find Service Honda's 30% discounted internet price just double click the part number you're interested in on the list to the right of the schematic and it comes up in the lower box. The only thing at this point is you still do not know if it is available from Honda. Service Honda pulls this old stuff from a Honda warehouse and doesn't keep it on hand once you order. Relatively quick and CHEAP shipping. I go to Bike Bandit and their system tells you if it's still available THEN I go to Service Honda and order it at the discounted price. Same warehouses better prices.

Now, are you totally confused? Try it, PM me if you need help. Remember, you can't get in if you can't get past your own security settings! 
SOHC4 Member #2393
2012 Tiger 800 Roadie
1972 CB500/4 (Goldie)
1979 CB900FZ
Dionysian Divagation (Steve's Blog)



Offline SteveD CB500F

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Honda Part Numbers: Finish Codes
« Reply #20 on: March 19, 2013, 11:32:11 AM »
Bob750 writes:

I've not been very active lately in here as I've been working on my wife's Honda Dream and frequenting the honda305.net forum. A gentleman well known on that forum is Bill Silver, and he tracked down some information for me that has helped me immensely for a handful of Honda Parts when I'm trying to order them. I thought the info could be of help to others on this forum, since it deals with Honda Part Numbers. I've pasted in the info here but have a PDF of the info if that would be better for placing in a file collection. (Or is there someplace in the forum I should upload it myself?) Thanks!

Here is the text:

Honda’s finish codes for motorcycle fasteners

Restorers often ask me about what was the original finish on a bike’s various metal parts. The end suffix code on the part number indicates the kind of material and how it was finished. There are duplicate finish treatments with two different codes, but I don’t know the reason behind that, to date.

CODE SUFFIX 1st digit MATERIAL
0=High Carbon Steel
1=Carbon Steel
3=Brass
4=Stainless

CODE SUFFIX 2nd digit SURFACE TREATMENT
A= Zinc Plate (White)
0= Zinc Plate (White)
B= Chrome Plate
2= Chrome Plate
C= Nickel Plate
3= Nickel Plate
H= Zinc Plate (Yellow)
8= Zinc Plate (Yellow)
J= Untreated
9=Untreated
G=Black
7=Black

This research started when a question came to me about what are the differences between these 5x25mm bolts listed by part number below.

93500-05025-1H Carbon Steel, Zinc (Yellow)
93500-05025-0A High Carbon Steel, Chrome
93500-05025-0G High Carbon Steel, Black
93500-05025-4J Stainless, Untreated
93500-05025-0B High Carbon Steel, Chrome
93500-05025-0H High Carbon Steel, Zinc (Yellow)

I didn’t have the answer, at the time, but did some research into AHMC departments and my request for information yielded the answers!

Bill Silver

www.vintagehonda.com
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 11:55:34 AM by SteveD CB500F »
SOHC4 Member #2393
2012 Tiger 800 Roadie
1972 CB500/4 (Goldie)
1979 CB900FZ
Dionysian Divagation (Steve's Blog)