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Author Topic: Wet sanding clear coat?  (Read 24539 times)

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Offline Nortstudio

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Wet sanding clear coat?
« on: March 22, 2011, 08:24:31 PM »
I have been painting my side covers.  Got some great info from a bunch of you guys, and hoped you could help me bring it home!

I'm at the final stage, And based on a procedure sheet I got from the Internet (oh god...) it stated to wet sand the final clear cost VERY LIGHTLY after letting it dry for a few days.  Did that.  I used a ton of dawn, water and 1500 grit.  It made the finish look a little dull in places. 

My question is: is this normal?  The sheet stated that after complete dry time and this last light sanding, that buffing would be the final step.  Will this cover and shine the slightly dull areas?  I ask because when I was done wet sanding my final color coat, it looked a little like this - and then the clear made all that go away.

Is this what the buffing compound will do, or do I need to do another clear coat.

Any suggestions for buffing compound for these plastic side covers?

Thanks in advance.
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

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Offline MasterChief750

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2011, 08:26:51 PM »
what i do is after final wet sand. buffing compound polishing compound then a good quality paste or liquid wax. my favorite process is 3m performance scratch remover, 3m polishing compound then 3m performace wax. its expensive but its great.
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Offline DarcyCB400F

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2011, 08:31:37 PM »
Final sand with 3000 with a thick interface pad on your sander then buff to a gloss. The gloss will be lost when you sand it BUT it will come back nicely when you buff them!
Question?? Why did you wet sand them if your clear was nice and shiny and no dirt in it? I don't understand why you would sand them... unless you wanted a flat shiny result?
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Offline Nortstudio

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2011, 08:38:15 PM »
Quote
Question?? Why did you wet sand them if your clear was nice and shiny and no dirt in it? I don't understand why you would sand them... unless you wanted a flat shiny result?

I was just following directions. :). There was also a bit of orange peel - but honestly not bad enough to bother me.  It said this was the final stepn(before buffing), so I did it.

When we talk "buffing" here, are we talking about with a wheel and rouge etc?  I was thinking it was just a wax type job?

Sorry for all the newbie questions
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

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Offline MasterChief750

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2011, 08:41:50 PM »
i would use automotive paint polishing compound. rouge would taky your paint down to metal.
1978 CB750 K - Project Red Headed Step Child
1976 CB750 K - Drag Bike
Some things i know, others i dont.
I AM THE STIG
Sam is THE STIG
he said i can be STIG3 tho

Offline Nortstudio

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2011, 08:43:51 PM »
That would be a good trick - I wouldn't mind raw metal side covers after all this painting and sanding.

So, is this auto paint polishing compound available at a typical auto store?
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

“Success is dependent on effort.”
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Offline MasterChief750

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2011, 08:48:25 PM »
yup. turtle wax is good. i prefer 3m. i do it in 3 steps. rubbing compound(coarsest) polishing compound then a good carbauna wax. dont buy that ice crap its junk. remember wax on wax off. if you dont have a buffer make sure you buy compounds that can be hand buffed otherwise the abbrasives in it wont break down as you polish.
1978 CB750 K - Project Red Headed Step Child
1976 CB750 K - Drag Bike
Some things i know, others i dont.
I AM THE STIG
Sam is THE STIG
he said i can be STIG3 tho

Offline Nortstudio

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2011, 08:50:35 PM »
Thanks for all the tips!  I don't have a proper buffer - just the 4" wheels that go on my drill from HF.  Maybe that will work better than by hand.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2011, 08:52:17 PM by Nortstudio »
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

“Success is dependent on effort.”
~Sophocles

bollingball

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2011, 08:51:59 PM »
Around here autozone and advanced auto don't. But NAPA has good paint stuff they mix paint too.

Offline ColinMc

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2011, 08:58:10 PM »
DO THIS BY HAND! For small pieces let alone small plastic pieces don't go anywhere near them with a DA for wetsanding or a buffer for polishing. Real easy to do by hand. I also wanted to clarify...you used a TON of dishwashing detergent? When i'm wet sanding in a shop I have a gallon bucket or hand sprayer full of water, with MAYBE one or two drops of dish soap in it...too much soap will make it so the paper doesn't cut as well as it should at all. But to answer your real question, after any wetsanding the surface will look dull and usually terrible...but smooth. Using a good compound will bring back the shine.

I also wouldn't recommend waxing them...just go with a good hand glaze for now. Waxing them now will cap off the relatively fresh paint and can lead to problems later. That paint will continue to outgas for a while before it's really cured.

Definitely use a good brand name compound for sure though. Turtle wax doesn't count as a good brand name...use 3M, Farecla...etc...something you'd find in a body shop, not in Wal-mart.

1975 Norton Commando 850 - mmmmm
1976 CB750K - Cafe Project...taking forever
1978 BMW R100/7 - All original
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Offline ColinMc

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2011, 09:00:19 PM »
Around here autozone and advanced auto don't. But NAPA has good paint stuff they mix paint too.

If you have a NAPA that mixes paint nearby, request the Farecla line of compounds and glazes, they should have a nice display with small 75ml containers of the stuff which goes a long way. Use the "Total" first, then the "G10" then the glaze. It's expensive but awesome stuff.
1975 Norton Commando 850 - mmmmm
1976 CB750K - Cafe Project...taking forever
1978 BMW R100/7 - All original
1984 Honda MB-5 - Two stroke fury (FOR SALE! PM ME)
2001 Ducati 748 - Built 996 motor sleeper

Offline Nortstudio

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2011, 09:05:01 PM »
I have a Napa, but not a real one.  It's a weird Brooklyn version - but I'll check it out.

The sheet I was following said to have a healthy amount of soap on there for the very last sanding (not the other sandings).  maybe "ton" was an exaggeration. I felt it getting the sand to surface - so I think I'm good. It definitely felt smoother afterwards.

Should I be waiting for a while to buff, since the gas is still coming out?
« Last Edit: March 22, 2011, 09:14:24 PM by Nortstudio »
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

“Success is dependent on effort.”
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Offline DYSKORD

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2011, 09:51:59 PM »
I have a Napa, but not a real one.  It's a weird Brooklyn version - but I'll check it out.

The sheet I was following said to have a healthy amount of soap on there for the very last sanding (not the other sandings).  maybe "ton" was an exaggeration. I felt it getting the sand to surface - so I think I'm good. It definitely felt smoother afterwards.

Should I be waiting for a while to buff, since the gas is still coming out?
I just did my seat and sidecovers, you can check my recent posts for pic. After final coat of clear I let the parts cure for 48hrs. (the longer the better, if you have a week, cure a week.) I then sanded with 1500 for a few passes with a sponge block and then went to town with 2000 foam block. My friends watching thought I was nuts. It obviously came out foggy. My goal was to sand away any gloss (dont go through to color coat!) Buy yourself Maquires Ultimate Compound and a foam drill applicator and go to town. It will blow your mind how shiny it will be after wiping off compound residual. Then I wax a few times with Maguires TechWax. Its as smooth as glass. My riding  gloves wont stay on tank when I set them on after riding! People are blown away when they hear its been rattle canned.

Offline Silverback

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2011, 11:27:00 PM »
I adamantly agree with Colin on the no wax for a month or even two. I know it works for somebody, but it is a risk and every manufacturers tech sheet I have read explicitly stated to use no wax for at least 30 days. As far as cut and buff goes, I always try to sand the day after clear. Its just easier that way and there are no ill affects. Then, I will let the clear cure a couple of days and then polish. The truth is, the softer the clear the easier it is to polish but easier to damage. Polishing is an art within itself and not only should you use successive compounds for the best polish, but you should also use moderate pressure, switching to light pressure within each polishing step. Just a few tips! It does sound like you are going for the perfect(see yourself) finish.

FYI: Just a couple drops of soap in 2 gallons is enough. It just keeps the sanding dust from sticking in your paper. They say not to use it on the previous steps because it's a possible contaminant.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2011, 11:35:46 PM by Silverback »
Chris
"It's hard to define soul. You get it in art. You get it in music, and occasionally you get it in machinery."
78 CB750F racer
78 CB750F stock
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71 CB750K (rusty rod)
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Offline DarcyCB400F

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2011, 06:05:02 AM »
You could just lay another coat of clear on them and then install them on your bike.... just another option...
1977 CJ360T
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1989 DR200R
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Offline Nortstudio

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2011, 06:45:44 AM »
You could just lay another coat of clear on them and then install them on your bike.... just another option...

Believe me, I've thought about that.  Almost did that before I wet sanded last night :)

I am married to getting it back to "shiny" now.  I guess it seems that the buffing will bring back the shine - and although I'm not really going for perfection (I doubted I'd get even THIS far!), I'd like it to look decent.   

The fact that there are no covers on there now - means that almost anything will look better.  But I took the time to TRY to do it right, so I will keep following the steps to see how close I can get it.

Worst case, I can always do it again next year  :P
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

“Success is dependent on effort.”
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Offline Kong

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2011, 07:16:25 AM »
Whoo ....

I have not put a single spot of wax on top of any bike I have painted in the last 10 years and I tell every single one of my customers that not only is there no reason at all to wax their bike but that in fact they should never wax their bike.  If you were a bike painter you would hate wax as much as I do.

OK, how to cut and buff a paint job.  I know this may sound odd to you but this is actually my favorite part of painting a bike - I love to cut and buff.

Cutting and buffing is just a continuation of the sanding process that was begun back when you were finishing up your prep work on the paint job.  You follow the same basic principle of going from coarser abrasives to finer.  This extends all the way to buffing compounds (you will use two or three different compounds of to do the job.

How to do it?  You start with well set paint that needs to be cut and buffed.  All paint jobs do not require cutting and buffing.  If you have no dust in the paint, no sags, no runs, and no orange-peel then there is no reason to cut and buff the piece.  Of course if you don't have a paint booth or the skills/equipment necessary to shoot a perfect job off the gun then you'll either have to put up with flaws or cut and buff.  Very few part time painters come up with a perfect job off the gun.  By the way, normally you'd shoot about 3 coats of clear, but if you haven't done this before it won't hurt a thing if you were to shoot 4 or 5 coats on the part.

You start with a well set up piece.  While most clear coats can be sanded about 24 hours after the last coat has been laid on its generally better to wait a little longer.  I personally like to give them 2 to 3 days to off-gas before I start sanding.  The reason for this wait is that clear coat, much like concrete, takes some time to fully set up.  By waiting an additional day or two you get a base that is just a little bit harder to sand through - not a bad thing for fellows who don't do this often.

Sanding:  

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCE SHOULD YOU EVER TRY TO SAND CLEAR COAT WITHOUT A SANDING BLOCK - NO BLOCK NO SANDING.

Back when you were preping you sanded you final coat of high build with about 400p paper (if you did it right).  Then you shot your sealer, color coats, and finally clear coated it.  Now because of trash (dust, bugs, sags, runs) in the clear and the dreaded "orange peel" you have to smooth it back out to completely flat and smooth before your buff it to a perfect shine.  You do not have to, and in fact you will be wasting tremendous amounts of time and effort, start sanding with extremely fine sand paper.  Start with paper somewhere in the 800p grit level and will end up, at about 1500p ~2000p.  There is never any reason to go any higher than 2000p, it won't make the job look any better or offer any other benefits.

Sand with water, never let the surface dry.  I personally like to use a 5-gallon bucket with soapy water in it as well as a water hose for frequent flushing.  Put just a very little bit of liquid dish soap in your water, it stops the sand paper from loading up and makes the job a whole lot easier.  Keep your working surface wet all the time.

Begin sanding by first soaking your paper, give it 20 minutes in the bucket before you even try to wrap it around your sanding block. Take your 800P and very quickly make one sanding pass over the part - let's say the tank.  Sand the tank until you have dulled the surface of the tank such that about 75% of the shine is gone.  What you will notice immediately is that on the very first sanding strokes that gets its top knocked off will be dust nibs, bug wings, and two or three strands of hair that fell out of your head and landed in the clear.  You will also see immediately where your sags and runs are.  Give them special and extremely careful attention right now with the coarser paper; flatten them out.  When you've dulled about 3/4 of the surface with the 800p grit change your paper and move up to 1000p grit.  This paper needs to be soaked first too - all wet/dry paper needs to be soaked before you use it.  With your 1000p grit paper you beging focusing in on specific problem areas.  All the shinney spots are problem (low) areas and of course any dust nibs will look like little round pimples by this stage of the game. Now comes the good part. Sanding very carefully you need to address every single flaw in the surface.  Making one swipe at a time - and never pressing down hard on the paper (let the grit of the paper do the work) - sand those flaws until they just disappear.  Do not continue sanding on a spot that has no flaws left in it.  Continue with the1000p grit paper until there are only a very few of the most stubborn flaws left - then you move up to 1500p grit paper.  Use your 1500p paper to bring the piece to full dull.  On those last flaws do your sanding one swipe at a time.  You will see the flaw get smaller with every pass of the block/paper and the pass that gets rid of it completely should be the last pass you make with the paper.

Now if you want to after the 1500p has been done you can go back and very lightly sand the entire surface with 2000p grit, but its not really necessary on most jobs.  I do it if there is a black or very dark color on the parts but if they are light colored I don't bother.

Now comes the buffing.  If you don't have a machine, can't borrow one (not likely), then I don't know what to tell you.  Sure, you could buff it by hand but I've never done that and wouldn't want to speculate about how you'd do it.  I will say this though, I do not honestly think most guys could possibly do a good buffing job by hand, at least not anywhere near the quality you'll get with a buffer.

Buffing is just sanding - really.  Its just sanding with even finer grits of material.  Sand paper cuts, buffing compounds cut.  Buffing pads also effect the rate at which material is removed.  Wool buffing covers are very coarse and are only use with coarse buffing compounds for the initial buffing.  Foam pads come in different degrees of 'hardness' and are graded from coarse to fine cutting capability.  Generally speaking they are color coded.

My own preferences in buffing compounds are 3M's Perfect-It II for almost all of the work and then Meguires (sp?) Swirl Remover to finish the job.  Perfect-It acts as a multi-grade compound so I use it first for an initial pass with a dedicated wool pad.  This first pass just knocks the dull off the surface.  With this done I rinse the piece completely with soapy and then clear water to remove any remaining compound.  I then go to Perfect-It with my coarse foam pad (at the moment I'm using a new set of pads from "Custom Shop" on my Makita 9227c buffer.  The set of pads is inexpensive (about $30 I believe) and they are holding up very nicel.  The second buffing with the foam pad and the 3M compound will begin to bring a nice shine.  Then I change to the medium pad and continue with the Perfect It, this give a shine that will blind you on a sunny day.  Wash the part down again and then its time to finish.  Using the finest finishing pad on the buffer I move on the the swirl remover.  I put this stuff on the pad directly and I also apply it to the part by hand.  Buff this last compound in and it will leave you a flawless surface.

And that's really about it.  Usually I can cut and buff a tank, pair of side covers, a fender or two, and a helmet in about 4 hours.  Most of the time is in the sanding, it doesn't actually take very long to buff bike parts.  Oh, now for tips - always make sure you have some way to hold the parts safe while buffing.  You can not possibly hold the part yourself and buff it at the same time.  Buffers snag parts and throw them through the air for great distances, and they always land on rocks or other sharp things.

As far as buffing goes, once again, let the machine do the work.  There is no reason to press down on the buffer (and lots of reasons not to).  Never let the compound dry out, add more when needed.  Do the work out of the sun if you are out doors.  Make sure where ever you do the work that you are in a place where no contaminants can blow onto the surface while you are sanding or buffing.

And that's about all that comes to mind at the moment - but if you've got questions I'll be more than happy to answer.  

On Edit:  Go to this website and read - it will answer every single question you might have about cutting and buffing:  http://www.autobody101.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=7&sid=178dbbc593e197d76a5c3d3b80d8cad0
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 07:40:09 AM by Kong »
2002 FXSTD/I  Softail Deuce
2001 Acura (Honda) CL Type-S
1986 Honda Rebel, 450
1978 Honda CB550K
1977 Honda CB550K

Offline ColinMc

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2011, 07:52:00 AM »
Great walkthrough Kong...the only thing i'm nervous about is someone who has never buffed before using a machine when all he is doing is the side covers...if he puts the side cover on his knee and goes to town with a microfiber and the same compounds you referred to he is a lot less likely to burn through. It'll take some elbow grease, but it takes the buffer out of the equation for causing other problems as well like some of the ones you mentioned lol.

I'm also surprised you start the wet sanding process as coarse as 800...the only time I go that course from the get go is if the job has a crapload of problems...but most times if it's that bad I hit it with 800(without breaking through) then re-clear. It's really easy to break through a couple layers of clear with 800...especially if it's either cheap clear or spray bomb clear.

I understand your process and whatnot, and the writeup is very clear...I know any seasoned detailer or paint shop guy could do your step by step and get a great results, i'm just worried about someone that has never done it before messing things up. No disrespect meant to you either Nortstudio...not calling you an idiot lol.



On a side note, what process was used for painting these side covers...i'm curious now. Was this just enamel clearcoat in a spraycan? Or was it the catalyzed spraymax stuff? Or did you get a paint gun involved?
1975 Norton Commando 850 - mmmmm
1976 CB750K - Cafe Project...taking forever
1978 BMW R100/7 - All original
1984 Honda MB-5 - Two stroke fury (FOR SALE! PM ME)
2001 Ducati 748 - Built 996 motor sleeper

Offline Kong

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2011, 07:59:01 AM »
Colin,

I agree with you.  I presumed that normal automotive type paints were used or the guy wouldn't bother to try and cut and buff it - finishing rattle can paint is like putting lipstick on a pig to my way of thinking.

On that 800 grit - well, I said I normally do a full bike in about a half a day - that is part of the reason.  It gets three quarters of the work done in about 1/10th the time.  In truth if I've got a sag or worse I'll drop down to 400p or so to take it out first, then move on up but the coarse stuff is only used to make the job go faster.  The 1000-grit will quickly take out the 800p scratches and it was going to be used anyway, so the coarser stuff is just a time saver; that and I'm basically lazy.   If the prep work was properly done back on the primer you don't have to worry much about sanding through on the clear coat because all the highs are already gone.

I also agree that the best way to do a side cover is not to lay the buffer down on one.  Generally for small parts I like to just sit down with the buffer nestled between my knees and then feed the part to the wheel.  That is the way I buff helmets too.   For everything else I use jigs that securely hold the parts.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 08:08:51 AM by Kong »
2002 FXSTD/I  Softail Deuce
2001 Acura (Honda) CL Type-S
1986 Honda Rebel, 450
1978 Honda CB550K
1977 Honda CB550K

Offline Duanob

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2011, 09:28:17 AM »
Nortstudio listen to Kong, he is da man when it comes to paint!

Curious what type of clear did you use? 2 part? Spraymax2000 is awesome stuff and is readily buffable. Buffing is the magic step. This might be overkill and I know buying another tool for the bike gets expensive but i bought the DA 7" buffer from HF and it works awesome. I figure I can buff the cars too so the expense was justified. For buffing the sdiecovers put the buffer upside down in a vise. There is a hold button on the trigger. Hold on tight to the sidecover and don't put pressure at all just let the buffer and anti-swirl compound do it's thing. Mine turned out pretty good for an amature. The buffer works great on the tank too. It's like magic!
The only problem left on my bike is the nut that holds onto the handle bars! ;)

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Offline Silverback

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2011, 09:45:30 AM »
I mount my buffer to the bench. This was a major "ah ha" moment for me in buffing out small parts.
Chris
"It's hard to define soul. You get it in art. You get it in music, and occasionally you get it in machinery."
78 CB750F racer
78 CB750F stock
75 CB750K Baby Blue Sold (She was a great bike!)
71 CB750K (rusty rod)
77 cb550F Sold :(  Bought it Back :)
Basket case 73 CB750, 77 CB750F (Building now)
01 Aprilia Falco
76 kz400
96 BMW K1100LT

Offline Kong

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2011, 12:01:20 PM »
You know, for some reason unknown to even the gods themselves I have not ever stuck my buffer in a vice - although I know as well as anyone that you guys are doing exactly the right thing.  It is hard to emphasize enough to a guy who hasn't done this just how easily that buffer will grab parts and hurl them at sharp objects.  It will break your fingers too.

I wish there was some way to photograph the process from start to finish, but it really doesn't come out well.  I have shown a couple of guys how to do it, and that is a very easy thing to do if they are standing right there next to you so you show them how and when they are doing it you can point and say - 'sand there until that spot is gone', or 'be sure to take long strokes and use all of the sanding block surface you can get on the target', and then show how to again if necessary.  It is a very easy process to learn how to do, but I understand how hard it can be to take sandpaper to your new paint job. Ya just gotta get over that fear.   Buffing, while on its face simpler, takes a little practice but if you keep the speed slow and always have the pad rotating off the surface edge its hard to do harm.  The thing about buffing is how spectacular the change is and how fast it happens.  It tends to just stun folks how much trash and sloppy painting can be overcome with cutting and buffing.

About the only other overall suggestion that I would give is take care not to cross-contaminate your buffing pads and always clean them completely as soon as you're done with them.  I wash mine out with a garden hose and then spin them dry on the buffer before laying them out to air dry before I put them back in their bags. 

By the way, is there any better smell in the world than Meguire's Swirl Remover?

2002 FXSTD/I  Softail Deuce
2001 Acura (Honda) CL Type-S
1986 Honda Rebel, 450
1978 Honda CB550K
1977 Honda CB550K

Offline Toxic

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2011, 12:12:31 PM »
Thanks Kong for that detailed explanation

that's copy / paste and print response

Offline Nortstudio

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2011, 02:21:22 PM »
Wow!  A little time away from the computer today, and I return to a full college degree in painting! :)

Sorry, I thought I had mentioned that this was all rattle can job.  I'm a first timer, and used fairly inexpensive paint and clear (I know, I know, but I figured this could always be a test run, as I don't mind doing it again if I hate it - just the learning experience is enough for now).

Kong, you helped me tremendously with the initial steps, in my other thread, but as often happens, I looked at a few different sources for info, and some mentioned steps that others omitted, and vice versus.  So I culled all the info together and started sanding and painting.

Turns out, I got most of this correct, based on your post to my initial thread, and based on this post here.  I think the key for any newbie to understand is that sanding really makes the side cover (or any other part I presume) look like you just ruined all you hard work you just finished.  That's not the case, because the next step keeps improving it.  But it's so natural to think that you are taking one step forward, two steps back!

The sheet I was following at the very end (which was specific to rattle can, and suggested to buff) was not specific with which product they use for the job.  So I was a little lost as to whether I should be looking at normal car polish (wax) or something more specialized. I think I now realize that this part of the procedure is more like sanding, but with a different, more fine grit product.

I realize that none of this work is ever going to make it look like I hired Kong to do it, or if I had used a spray gun with quality products, but I started down this path, so I wanted to at least see it through.

For the record, after all this is "over" (will it EVER be over?) I will be stripping my tank and using SprayMax 2 stage clear on it.  I was planning on going over these side covers with it - but since I had to order it from afar - paid almost as much in shipping as I did for the can,
I figured I'd save it for the tank.

I have no delusions that this will be the best job on the planet - and there is reason to keep the bike looking modest being parked on NYC streets all year long, but I'm going for itnbest I can - and all your help has been amazing, and made this job a little less scary.....a little :)

Last question: would it help to use the buffing wheels I grabbed from HF on my drill?  Or is that just worse than by hand???  They are 4" type that go right into the drill.

Scott
« Last Edit: March 23, 2011, 02:24:57 PM by Nortstudio »
1976 CB550K...in progress
1975 CL360...eventually custom
2009 Husqvarna TE610

a blog about wrenching in Barre, VT

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Offline Kong

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Re: Wet sanding clear coat?
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2011, 03:00:40 PM »
If we are thinking about the same wheel it would be worse than nothing.  Are you thinking about the sort of buffing wheel that is generally used to buff metals, the ones that are made of soft cloth?

The pads I'm talking about are more like pancakes of foam rubber with velcro on the back.  The foam itself provides a very soft backing that is the carrier for the abrasive - and you are exactly right, you are simply carrying the abrasives to finer and finer levels, even at the level of the swirl remover.  Its not at all like wax, which of course is a coating. 


By the way, every paint job I do, when I start it, I think its going to be the best paint job in the world.  I want it to be.  So I think about it, what I'm going to do and how I'm going to do it and nearly as important, when I'm going to do it.  Of course they never do - come out to be the best in the world that is - but I always try.
2002 FXSTD/I  Softail Deuce
2001 Acura (Honda) CL Type-S
1986 Honda Rebel, 450
1978 Honda CB550K
1977 Honda CB550K

 

;
Honda