Author Topic: POR-15  (Read 6056 times)

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Offline orkid1989

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POR-15
« on: October 04, 2011, 01:14:49 am »

here is a guide for someone who is interested in using a POR-15 kit to revive that rusted old gas tank.
other than the kit you will need:
  • something to plug up the tank (in my case i bought 2 rubber corks from the local hardware store)
  • tape if necessary to hold the cork in
  • something to open the sealer can with (i use a flat head screwdriver)
  • funnel to keep the mess down
  • latex gloves
  • eye protection
  • either a heat gun or a hair dryer
  • soft shop rags

the kit i bought is the heavy duty cycle repair kit due to the fact that the tank i am working on today is pretty rusted and possibly has a failed repair kit in it. the kit comes with:
  • 1 Quart Marine Clean
  • 1 Quart Metal Ready
  • 1 Quart POR-Strip
  • 8oz Gas Tank Sealer
  • Repair Cloth
  • 1" Foam Brush


POR-STRIP
If your fuel tank had been repaired or coated in the past, that
coating must now be removed before the tank can be properly
sealed again.  POR-Strip will remove or dissolve whatever
coating had been previously applied.  Follow instructions
carefully and avoid breathing vapors.  This step should be done
ideally in an open garage, not in an enclosed area or outside in
wind or sun.


MARINE-CLEAN
This is the fi rst product you will use in the restoration of your fuel
or utility tank.  Marine-Clean is a very powerful cleaner that will
break down gum and varnish deposits in your fuel tank, but it
will take time and often repeated application.  A hot solution of
Marine-Clean is more effective than a cold solution. This product
is caustic and alkaline, and therefore your tank must be neutralized
and acidifi ed before gas tank sealer can be used most effectively.


METAL-READY
Metal-Ready is an excellent prep for any coating or paint
product, and it’s essential that it be used before gas tank sealer
is applied to your tank.  Metal-Ready is also the best rust
remover available, and it will dissolve all the rust and scale that
has formed in your tank.  In instances of heavily built-up rust
formed over many years of neglect, the application and use of
Metal-Ready will enable your POR-15 Fuel Tank Sealer to
chemically bond with whatever rust may remain in the tank and 
form a permanent non-porous barrier against further rusting. 
The primary job of Metal-Ready is to change the ph of your tank
from alkaline to acid, because coatings and paints stick much
better to acid-prepped metals.  Be sure to rinse your tank
thoroughly with water afterward, neutralizing the surface.


TANK SEALER
The Tank Sealer in your kit is impervious to all conventional
automotive and diesel fuels.  The most important thing to
remember is that your tank must be totally, completely, bone-dry
before the sealer can be poured into it.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 01:37:09 am by orkid1989 »
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2011, 01:31:04 am »

DIRECTIONS
The preparation products, though non-toxic, should be handled
with latex gloves and eye protection.

1.PREPARATION: Empty tank of all fuel and rinse out with
clean water; remove fuel petcock, fl oat, fi lters, fi ttings, etc. Seal
up those openings in the tank with duct tape or cork to keep the
solutions in the tank when you clean, prep and seal the tank.


2.Outside painted surface of your tank should be protected
from preparation and sealing products with soft rags or other
suitable protection.

3.Pour in POR-Strip and agitate the tank to cover all the
surfaces, keep stripper in the tank for a minimum of 15 mins, but
no longer than 1 hour. Use warm water to clean and fl ush the
tank of stripper and any loose sealant.       
     
4.MARINE CLEAN: This product cleans varnish and rust
out of the tank.  It leaves the metal surface alkaline and must be
treated with METAL READY to create an acidic surface for the
sealant to stick to. GLOVES AND EYE PROTECTION SHOULD
BE WORN AT ALL TIMES.
Mix your quart of MARINE CLEAN with 1 quart of VERY WARM
(not scalding hot) water. Extremely hot water could melt the
adhesive on the duct tape. Note The higher temperature of the
water helps to activate the chemical process of the cleaner.
Pour the mixture into the tank, shake vigorously, and “roll” the
tank around to ensure the cleaner gets to all inside surfaces
for a minimum of 20 minutes.  Now empty the solution from the
tank and rinse it out with water. 

5.METAL READY: This product makes the metal surface acidic
and removes rust, which is necessary for the sealer to
effectively bond to the surface.
Pour the entire bottle of Metal Ready into the tank. NOTE: Tank
should be empty of rinsing water but does not have to be dry
before using Metal Ready. 
Roll the tank around to ensure it coats all surfaces for a
 minimum of 20 minutes. Place the tank in different positions
every half hour until the entire inside of the tank has been
treated with Metal Ready. Metal Ready should not be in the
tank longer than 2 hours. Rinse the tank thoroughly with WARM
– not scalding hot – water several times and drain it thoroughly
(low spots in tanks collect water so be sure to roll tank around
to get as much water out as possible). 
In order to get the tank completely dry, you must blow warm air
into it because no tank will dry out on the inside by itself.  The
only way to do this job is to use forced air. This can be
accomplished by using a hair dryer or hot air gun.  TANKS
MUST BE COMPLETELY DRY INSIDE BEFORE SEALING. 
THE SEALER WILL NOT STICK TO A DAMP OR WET TANK.

No shortcuts, please.  If any moisture is present in the tank
when you pour in the sealer, IT WILL NOT WORK PROPERLY
and all your hard work will be wasted.
NOTE: Once the metal is treated, it can fl ash rust. Though the
coating is designed to bond with any new fl ash rust, ideally
you’ll want to perform the forced air drying promptly after
draining the tank, and coat the tank with sealant soon after
drying it.

lazy way to dry

5.SEALER: (open the POR-15 Sealer and stir until a uniform
color is achieved. CAUTION! Pour entire contents of can
into the tank. Roll the tank SLOWLY to ensure it coats the insides
uniformly.  In tanks with seams, and with low areas below the
opening through which you are draining the sealant (typically the
petcock hole) the sealant will puddle.  Take great care to ensure
you’ve drained out the excess.  Any pooled material can cause
you trouble later. 

IMPORTANT!  This is a very strong and durable coating.  Take
care to immediately clean surfaces on which you may have
spilled the sealer.  Any sealer remaining on painted surfaces will
become permanent.  Any excess sealer must be cleaned from
screw hole threads for the petcock before it dries.  A clean soft
rag can be twisted into the screw holes to clean the material out. 
A Q-Tip is also effective for this job.

6.FINAL NOTES
Follow directions on sealer can and let cure for at least 96 hours
(4 days) before pouring  in fuel.
total cost around $55
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 02:06:17 am by orkid1989 »
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline stidds

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2011, 01:56:13 am »
Thank you for putting this up as I am about to do my tank with POR15 in the next few days and your post will be a massive help.

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2011, 02:03:45 am »
glad i could help. ive done 3 tanks so far and this stuff is awesome. just takes a while. also try to avoid getting any of the chemicals on you. the rust removers will burn and the sealer is a nightmare to get off. my hands were gray for over a week the first time i did it lol
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline Lavis500

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2011, 03:35:46 am »
Do you have any pics of doing a tank that had a failed previous coating?  I've got a tank that I've put the POR-strip through as well as acetone, industrial stripper, pretty much everything short of pure MEK (though some of the strippers had a decent amount of it in their mixture), and I've had no success removing the old Kreem.  I've been thinking about splitting the tank anyways so I can pop out a couple dents, but I'd like advice on cleaning up the remaining coating.
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Offline MoMo

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2011, 06:07:29 am »
Could this be moved to the How To section, seems like it would be a good reference. 

Very nice job of documenting the procedure orkid.....Larry

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2011, 10:07:44 am »
Do you have any pics of doing a tank that had a failed previous coating?  I've got a tank that I've put the POR-strip through as well as acetone, industrial stripper, pretty much everything short of pure MEK (though some of the strippers had a decent amount of it in their mixture), and I've had no success removing the old Kreem.  I've been thinking about splitting the tank anyways so I can pop out a couple dents, but I'd like advice on cleaning up the remaining coating.
No sorry I don't have a pic. How long did you leave the POR strip in it? Most any stripper should work but might take a while depending on how thick they put it on. Correct me if I am mistaken but I don't thing stripper eats metal so might wanna do it for a few hours and see if their is any progress. Just make sure to keep checking the corks for leaks
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2011, 10:10:19 am »
Could this be moved to the How To section, seems like it would be a good reference. 

Very nice job of documenting the procedure orkid.....Larry

Sorry feel free to move it because I have no clue how lol. And the procedure is directly out of the instruction sheet that comes with the kit. I just shortened it and added some pics
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline Coyote13

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2011, 10:38:14 am »
Nice write up, and thanks.   About to POR my CB100 tank, this should help a bunch!
'78 CB750K.  Throttle ripper.
'71 CB100.  Grocery getter.
'01 XL883.  Panty dropper. Gone but not forgotten.

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2011, 11:31:22 am »
Nice write up, and thanks.   About to POR my CB100 tank, this should help a bunch!
glad I could help. Just make sure you take your time. If you try to rush through it something is bound to go wrong.
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline Lavis500

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2011, 11:53:52 am »
Do you have any pics of doing a tank that had a failed previous coating?  I've got a tank that I've put the POR-strip through as well as acetone, industrial stripper, pretty much everything short of pure MEK (though some of the strippers had a decent amount of it in their mixture), and I've had no success removing the old Kreem.  I've been thinking about splitting the tank anyways so I can pop out a couple dents, but I'd like advice on cleaning up the remaining coating.
No sorry I don't have a pic. How long did you leave the POR strip in it? Most any stripper should work but might take a while depending on how thick they put it on. Correct me if I am mistaken but I don't thing stripper eats metal so might wanna do it for a few hours and see if their is any progress. Just make sure to keep checking the corks for leaks

I had a makeshift plate and rubber gasket that I put over the petcock hole using the petcock screws (CB500 tank) and I placed some thin gasket material over the gas port and closed the cap, effectively sealing it.  Easy to do and absolutely no leaks!  I had tried the non-POR heavy duty strippers before this, and I left them in there for about a week, sloshing the tank around every time I got in the garage, always changing position, giving it a good soak.  When that didn't work I rinsed it all out with acetone, and I tried the POR-strip.  I let that sit for a couple of days.  I did get a few small chunks out, and if I rubbed it hard with my finger it would wipe off.  Unfortunately, I can't do the full interior surface area of tank that is still assembled.

**Sigh** Oh well. It gives me something to do when I get back to the states.  tear apart my tank, clean the inside real nice, pop out some dents, POR it, and eventually send it to somebody to get painted.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 11:57:02 am by Lavis500 »
"Whatever it is, I swear I didn't do it!"

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Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2011, 12:41:40 pm »
Wow I would almost suggest trying electrolysis
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Offline Coyote13

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2011, 05:40:38 pm »
I would actually almost agree.  Seems it might be easier than cutting the whole damned thing apart...
'78 CB750K.  Throttle ripper.
'71 CB100.  Grocery getter.
'01 XL883.  Panty dropper. Gone but not forgotten.

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2011, 09:17:58 pm »
I would actually almost agree.  Seems it might be easier than cutting the whole damned thing apart...
i would say give it a try. if it doesn't work they you only waste a few bucks on material vs having to cut the tank apart
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline Lavis500

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2011, 12:20:36 am »
I've read into the electrolysis before - while it would be great for removing rust, it's not really going to help with removing the old coating that is still stuck.  Plus I still have dents to pop out on either side.  If I don't tear the tank apart, I'd have to drill a hole in the center of the dent and pull it out, patch up the hole...  definitely sounds like it would be easier to just grind the tank seam down past the weld, split it, clean it, pop it out, then just weld it back together and coat it.  Terry in Australia did this last year and posted pics.  Should be pretty straight forward.
"Whatever it is, I swear I didn't do it!"

'73 CB500 - Sally

Offline orkid1989

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2011, 11:44:31 am »
Well best of luck to you. Im not brave enough to try cutting my tank open.
“Experience is the name every one gives to their mistakes.” Oscar Wilde

Offline wingman1946

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Re: POR-15
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2011, 07:41:08 am »
I've read into the electrolysis before - while it would be great for removing rust, it's not really going to help with removing the old coating that is still stuck.  Plus I still have dents to pop out on either side.  If I don't tear the tank apart, I'd have to drill a hole in the center of the dent and pull it out, patch up the hole...  definitely sounds like it would be easier to just grind the tank seam down past the weld, split it, clean it, pop it out, then just weld it back together and coat it.  Terry in Australia did this last year and posted pics.  Should be pretty straight forward.

Not necessary to drill hole. Use a nail gun. Body shops have them. They temporarily weld a nail to the dent and then the nail is pulled with a slide hammer. The nail will then be easily removed by twisting. Try not to blow yourself up.