Author Topic: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?  (Read 2078 times)

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Offline killersoundz

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What torque number should I shoot for with stainless steel bolts into aluminum for my valve cover and all the other outside covers? I will be using anti seize.
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http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=107447.0

My CB750K4 Starting up for the first time after a seized motor and rebuild!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FzmvthoBPo



Offline dave500

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dont toque them,just feel them up,you will strip threads using a torque wrench on 6mm bolts.



Offline killersoundz

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You sure? I have an inch pound. I can't go for like 6ft lbs or something?
My project thread:

http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=107447.0

My CB750K4 Starting up for the first time after a seized motor and rebuild!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FzmvthoBPo



Offline dave500

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im sure,,the cover isnt like a head gasket,it only has the crush the rubber gasket down.



Offline killersoundz

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im sure,,the cover isnt like a head gasket,it only has the crush the rubber gasket down.

Ok so just a little snug tighten then

I do typically prefer to use a torque wrench though. I sort of have monkey grip and always over tighten stuff
My project thread:

http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=107447.0

My CB750K4 Starting up for the first time after a seized motor and rebuild!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FzmvthoBPo



Offline Stev-o

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And are you using anti-sieze?
'74 Honda 750K [836]   '77 Honda 750K project    76 Honda 550K cafe      plus plus plus



Offline killersoundz

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And are you using anti-sieze?

Yes
My project thread:

http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=107447.0

My CB750K4 Starting up for the first time after a seized motor and rebuild!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FzmvthoBPo



Offline matt mattison

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Use a 1/4 ratchet or a nut driver handle if you can. That way it's harder to over tighten the fastner. Just snug those down, they don't need to be too tight.
1975 CB550F
2011 MV Agusta Brutale 1090RR



Offline lrutt

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I guess after 40 years of wrenching it's a feel thing. When TQing the 6mm screws, I grasp the ratchet by the head portion and tighten. Not reef on it, just tighten it up. I've never had a strip out or leak. Don't know for sure what I end up with but it sure works.

2006 Harley Sporster 1200C
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2001 Honda XR650L
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1984 Yamaha Virago 1000
1978 Honda 750K w/sidecar
1977 Moto Guzzi Lemans 850
1976 Honda CB750K
1973 Norton 850
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bollingball

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I agree no torque wrench. Also I don't if it true but I read on here some where that you should use the copper not silver anti-sieze. May someone can confirm this.
Ken



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Re: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2012, 10:41:27 AM »
im sure,,the cover isnt like a head gasket,it only has the crush the rubber gasket down.

Ok so just a little snug tighten then

I do typically prefer to use a torque wrench though. I sort of have monkey grip and always over tighten stuff
Some of us have tightened enough screws to have the feel. According to this chart, 6mm pans are 5 to 8 ft lbs. So with your torques wrench just go to 6ft lbs (72 inch lbs). Maybe tighten one with the "choke up on the wrench" method, then check it with your torque wrench to get the feel for 6 ft lbs.

Also, there is some value to having them all equal, which you may do better with a torque wrench.

Then if there is a leak, you can cinch them up a tad more.

But in the end, you can do them with a regular wrench, choked up on the handle. Once you get the feel. AND, no sense in making them tighter than they need to be to seal the gasket.
Ride Safe:
Ron
1988 NT650 HawkGT;  1978 CB400 Hawk;  1975 CB750F -Free Bird; 1968 CB77 Super Hawk -Ticker;  Phaedrus 1972 CB750K2- Build Thread
Youth and Talent are no match for Age and Treachery.



Offline Stev-o

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Re: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2012, 09:19:38 PM »
I've also read to use the copper anti-seize. But unless you plan on keeping for 30 years, will it matter?
'74 Honda 750K [836]   '77 Honda 750K project    76 Honda 550K cafe      plus plus plus



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Re: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2012, 10:23:57 PM »
I've also read to use the copper anti-seize. But unless you plan on keeping for 30 years, will it matter?
Really. We don't want to deprive the next generation of UJM restorers the thrill of drilling out corroded screws do we?

And it should be reminded the place that needs the anti seize is not so much the threads as under the head of the screw where it mashes down on the cover. THAT's where the seize takes place as that's where the environment that causes the chemical reaction exists. (moisture, road spray, etc.)  And putting even a tiny dab under the head of the screw makes for a very messy install.
Ride Safe:
Ron
1988 NT650 HawkGT;  1978 CB400 Hawk;  1975 CB750F -Free Bird; 1968 CB77 Super Hawk -Ticker;  Phaedrus 1972 CB750K2- Build Thread
Youth and Talent are no match for Age and Treachery.



Offline killersoundz

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Re: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2012, 11:02:18 PM »
I read NOT to use the copper kind? So I didn't.   And oh. I used it mostly on the threads
My project thread:

http://forums.sohc4.net/index.php?topic=107447.0

My CB750K4 Starting up for the first time after a seized motor and rebuild!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FzmvthoBPo



Online MCRider

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Re: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2012, 11:08:36 PM »
I read NOT to use the copper kind? So I didn't.   And oh. I used it mostly on the threads

I used it, but to me the need is overblown on an engine that won't see alot of water. As long as you're owning it, you'll likely be breaking them free every other year or so for something and that's all you need to do. Its the humidity, road spray, and passage of time that sticks them.

Now if it were a boat, or a dirt bike, you see?
Ride Safe:
Ron
1988 NT650 HawkGT;  1978 CB400 Hawk;  1975 CB750F -Free Bird; 1968 CB77 Super Hawk -Ticker;  Phaedrus 1972 CB750K2- Build Thread
Youth and Talent are no match for Age and Treachery.



bollingball

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Re: Torque spec for stainless steel bolts into aluminum, valve cover etc?
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2012, 03:05:52 AM »
I read NOT to use the copper kind? So I didn't.   And oh. I used it mostly on the threads

I used it, but to me the need is overblown on an engine that won't see alot of water. As long as you're owning it, you'll likely be breaking them free every other year or so for something and that's all you need to do. Its the humidity, road spray, and passage of time that sticks them.

Now if it were a boat, or a dirt bike, you see?

Good point and I agree to use it on the head. I just can not remember where to use the copper and why. I wish some one could explain. I have always used the silver.

Ken